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Tata Sky Ltd - Consumer Electronics - India

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

 Tata Sky Ltd - Consumer Electronics - India



Tata Sky Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         Tata Sky is aiming for eight million subscribers by 2012, a significant increase from two million subscribers it had in 2008.  Tata is also looking to offer different levels of service, with personal video recording at the premium end and budget service packs at the economy end.
·         The company intends to be the leading satellite service provider in the country. It is also staying at the forefront of innovative technology driving services and diversifying into internet and related services using its Sky experience and technology.
·         The company faces increased competition with the launch of BIG TV by the Reliance Group and Airtel DTH by the mobile phone services Bharti Group.  These launches are likely to result in price wars, as the new players need to penetrate into the market and maintain market share.
·         As of 2008, Tata Sky was not yet generating any profit, with launch and marketing costs far outweighing sales.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Tata Sky Ltd
Address:
Bombay Dyeing AO building, Pandurang Budhkar Marg Worli  Mumbai 400 025, India
Tel:
(+91) 22 6613 3000
Fax:
(+91) 22 6613 3030
www:
www.tatasky.com
Activities:
Direct-to-home satellite television service provider
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, Trade press,



2005
2006
2007
Net sales (Rs million)
0
3,221
5,412.1
Net profit (Rs million)
-530
-8,150
-8640
Source:           Trade press, Company research



Company Background

·         Tata Sky is an 80/20 joint venture owned by Tata Sons and the Star Group.  The company was incorporated in 2004 and it entered the market in 2006.  Currently, the company is not listed on the stock exchange, and it is not required to submit an annual report. 
·         Tata Sky competes in the television and projectors sector in India, via its set-top box (STB) service.  Tata Sky’s STBs are sourced from Humax and Thomson, but they carry the Tata Sky brand.  Consumers buy STBs and cards to gain access to the services while Tata Sky installs and activates the services. 
·         Within two years of operation, Tata Sky has penetrated more than 5,000 Indian towns and cities with its STBs. It intends to increase its penetration while at the same time offering a wider variety of service packages at different prices.
·         In 2008, Tata Sky launched the Tata Sky Plus service which allows subscribing viewers to record and watch their programmes at later times.  This premium service includes an upgraded set top box.


Production

·         Tata Sky began importing its set top boxes from Humax and Thomson, but now these STB manufacturers have established themselves in India for Tata Sky, and their domestic production has helped Tata Sky offer STBs at a much lower rate to its customers. 
·         Manufacturers supplying Tata Sky include Kaon Media, a South Korean company whose unit is based in Uttaranchal; France’s Thomson Electronics which has a unit in Pune; and South Korean company Humax, which is based in Noida.
·         As Tata Sky is a DTH service provider, manufacturing is not the company’s principal activity. The company does not manufacture any products for third parties.


Competitive Positioning

·         Tata Sky is a single business company focused on delivering DTH television to its subscribers.  The company markets a narrow product portfolio, retailing only digital set-top boxes under the Tata Sky and Tata Sky Plus brands.
·         DTH services are positioned above free-to-air and cable-based television services, and thus they occupy the premium position in India.  However, among the DTH service providers themselves, market positioning has not yet settled, as new players Airtel and BIG entered the market 2008.  However, between traditional competitors DishTV, Doordarshan and Tata Sky, the latter is seen as the more premium service, with higher prices and limited freebies.
·         Tata Sky ranks twelfth overall in terms of volume share in the consumer electronics market in India.  It has climbed rapidly up the rankings since 2007, its first full year of operation, and it has grown its subscriber base to two million in a period of 20 months. 
·         As one of the early entrants into DTH, Tata Sky has an “early mover” advantage, already having established its dealer and service networks across the country.  This has given the company and brand leadership positions, and it has been a pioneer in offering technology-driven value-added services to consumers, such as active/interactive viewing and personal video recorder set-top boxes. 
·         Tata Sky intends to maintain its leadership position in the DTH market.  However, the company faces challenges from new entrants BIG and Airtel, who bring with them established distribution networks that have been successful in the other sectors in which these companies compete. As well, these companies have the ability to support promotions with marketing muscle. For example, BIG could easily piggy-back on Reliance Communications’ strong and deep networks in the mobile phone service sector. Cross-promotions and bundled packages targeting existing customers of sister companies/services would no doubt help the new entrants quickly gain market share. 
·         Tata Sky is operating in a high-growth market.  However, as the marketplace becomes more crowded over the forecast period the company will no doubt lose share. It could hold on to its leadership position if remains proactive and is perceived as a customer-friendly brand.

Product type
Volume share
Rank
Consumer Electronics
0.5%
12
Televisions and Projectors
5%
5
Source:           Euromonitor International


Accessorising the Home - UK-United Kingdom

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

                          

Accessorising the Home - UK-Dissertation Writing Help


Issues in the Market


This report takes a look at products that are commonly used to accessorise the home. Over the last year sales growth has dwindled. The slowing of the housing market has reduced demand and lack of consumer confidence, the rising cost of living and growth in unemployment has caused consumers to cut back on unnecessary expenditure. Those that are buying home accessories are trading down to cheaper products, switching to value retailers or buying premium products at cheaper prices. Heavy discounting at the end of 2008 has dampened sales further.

However, it is not all doom and gloom. The fact that home accessories offer consumers a cheaper way to change the look of a room than buying new furniture or flooring has meant that the market is likely to fair better than those categories. Manufacturers and retailers need to ensure they offer consumers value for money both at the bottom and top-end of the market.

Key themes
              How interested are consumers in the look of their homes?
              What effect has the economic downturn had on the home accessories market?
              Importance of fashion trends to the market and the extent fast fashion has extended from clothing to home accessories.
              How much are consumers looking for a complete look in terms of home furnishings and accessories?
              What opportunities are there for targeting home accessories at particular groups?
              Which retailers are gaining market share in these more difficult times?


Strengths and Weaknesses in the United Kingdom Market





Strengths
              High penetration levels – Nearly eight out of ten consumers purchased some kind of home accessories in the last year and just under a quarter have bought five or more different types of home accessory.
              Consumer interest – Over four in ten consumers agree that the look of their home is very important to them and that home accessories help create the mood and feel of a room.
              A cheaper alternative – Home accessories offer consumers a cheaper way to change the look of a room than buying new furniture.
              Something for everyone – A wide variety of products at different price-bands catering for those wanting classic, modern or vintage products.
              Innovation – Manufacturers and retailers have launched new and interesting accessories, including multi-functional, environmentally-friendly and celebrity-endorsed products.

Weaknesses
              The gender divide – Women are the key purchasers of home accessories, with men more apathetic towards the market.
              Low pricing & discounting – the cheap products offered by supermarkets, DIY stores and fashion retailers, combined with promotional discounting, are reducing the potential value of the market.
              Low replacement levels – the long lifespan of home accessories means that replacement sales are low and retailers have to rely on new fashion trends and products to stimulate demand.
              Reliance on the housing market – Moving house is a key trigger for purchasing home accessories. Sales performance is therefore heavily reliant on the performance of the housing market.
              A non-essential purchase – When consumers are tightening their belts, home accessories which serve no practical function are likely to be taken off the shopping list.
              Brand communication – The majority of manufacturers and retailers spend very little on above-the-line promotion for home accessories.

              Dominance of retailer own-label brands – Department stores, variety stores, DIY chains and supermarkets mainly sell own-label products which makes it difficult for other suppliers to compete.

                          

Accessorising the Home - UK 

The Consumer – Buying Accessories for the Home


Key points
              Bedlinen and towels are the most frequently purchased home accessories, followed by window furnishings.
              Women and families are key purchasers of home accessories.
              Just under a quarter of consumers have bought five or more types of home accessory in the last year.

ITEMS PURCHASED
This section of the report examines the results of research conducted by BMRB Online on behalf of Mintel into the purchasing of home accessories. Between 30 October and 2 November 2008, a sample of 1,000 online adults aged 16-64 living in Great Britain were asked the following question:

“Which of the following, if any, have you bought in the last 12 months?”

The response data are presented in the following sub-sections and in Appendix – Buying Accessories for the Home, analysed by various demographic breaks and other lifestyle characteristics.

Linens are top of the pile
FIGURE 26: Home accessories bought in the last 12 months, October/November 2008

Base: 1,000 online adults aged 16-64

%


Duvet sets/pillow cases
48
Bathroom towels
35
Curtains/blinds
28
Photo frames
28
Bathroom accessories
27
Candles/candle holders
27
Cushions/throws/rugs
26
Lighting/shades
26
Pictures/prints/mirrors
22
Vases/ornamental bowls
14


Don't know
1
None of these
22


SOURCE: BMRB/Mintel

              Nearly eight out of ten consumers purchased some kind of home accessories in the last year. Given the longevity of most home accessories this suggests that consumers are not just buying accessories out of necessity, but out of a desire to update the look of their home.
              Bed linen and bathroom towels are the most frequently bought home accessories with over a third or more buying them in the last year. This reflects the fact that the trend towards cheap, disposable fashion seen in the clothing industry has transferred to the household linens market, reducing replacement cycles.
              Vases and ornamental bowls are the least likely home accessories to have been bought in the last year. Vases tend to be only used occasionally and people tend to have plain glass vases that go with any colour scheme. This means that consumers don’t feel the need to replace them very often. Sales of ornamental bowls suffer from the fact that they serve no functional purpose.

A woman’s prerogative
              Women are the main purchasers of home accessories. They are more likely to buy all categories of home accessories than men.
              This suggests that traditional gender stereotypes still hold true and that the home and its decoration are still very much a woman’s domain.

Key analysis: To get men to engage with the home accessories market retailers need to promote accessorising the home as part of the DIY process. B&Q with its traditional DIY emphasis is well placed to do this. Accessories that serve a practical purpose such as clocks and lighting are most likely to appeal to men. Brands also appeal more to men, so there is room for the development of ‘male’ brands into this area.

A family affair
              Age is a key factor affecting the purchase of home accessories, with those aged 25-54 most likely to buy nearly all types of home accessories.
              Photo frames have slightly wider appeal, as they are just as popular with 16-24-year-olds as older consumers. They are particularly popular with those aged 25-34 most likely as a result of this being a key period when people get married and have children.
              The influence of age on purchasing habits is closely linked to the presence of children. Those with children are much more likely to buy home accessories than those without. The one noticeable exception is candles where the safety aspect of having candles near young children makes families less likely to buy them.

Key analysis: To tempt families, retailers should offer promotional offers such as money off children’s cushions when you buy cushions for the living room. They could also provide variety packs of photo frames or family packs of bath towels containing adult and children-sized towels or discounts on children’s duvet covers when buying a double duvet cover.

The class divide
              When it comes to buying home accessories, those in the C2DE socio-economic groups are more likely to buy most categories of products than those in the ABC1 groups.
              This may be because home accessories offer less wealthy consumers a cheap way to update the look of their home and because more wealthy consumers may choose to buy more expensive, more long-lasting products and therefore need to replace them less often.
              The exception to this pattern is bathroom towels, where ABC1s are slightly more likely to have bought them in the last year than C2DEs.
              This could be because the frequent use of towels can leave towels less absorbent and fluffy so more wealthy consumers choose to replace them more often.

Key analysis: This suggests that there is room for premiumisation in the bath linens category with products like Christy’s “Embrace with silk” range of towels which contain silk to create highly absorbent and luxurious towels should sell well.

In all categories, retailers need to ensure they have a strong value offering and tempt consumers to buy more by updating designs regularly.

NUMBERS OF TYPES OF PRODUCTS BOUGHT
To identify key consumer targets in this market, Mintel has divided consumers according to the number of different home accessories categories they purchased items from. Key findings are listed below with detailed demographics in the Appendix section of this report.


No categories
              Just under a quarter of consumers have not bought any home accessories in the last year.
              Gender and age are key attributes here with these consumers tending to be men and those aged 16-24.

Key analysis: Funky modern styling and gadgets are key to targeting these consumers, with statement lighting and digital clocks likely to appeal to them.

Five or more categories
              Just under a quarter of consumers have bought five or more types of home accessories in the last year.
              Gender and lifestage are important factors here, as these consumers tend to be women aged 25-54 and have children. They show a bias towards the C2DE socio-economic groups.

Key analysis: These consumers are key buyers of home accessories and manufacturers need to maintain and look to increase the number of products they buy. This could be done by cross-category promotions such as money off vases when you buy a cushion or by using ‘create the look’ and room displays to encourage them to update all the accessories in a particular room.

Samsung Malaysia Electronics Sdn Bhd - Consumer Electronics - Malaysia

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Samsung Malaysia Electronics Sdn Bhd

 Samsung Malaysia Electronics Sdn Bhd - Consumer Electronics - Malaysia

Strategic Direction

·         Samsung aims to be one of the world's recognised leaders in digital technology through constant innovation, strategic alliances and excellent R&D facilities from their parent company, Samsung in Korea.
·         Samsung is expected to gain a better market share as it has the knowledge and expertise in the consumer electronics market. Its range of products is impressive and attractively priced with advanced features and usage.
·         Its main challenge in the electronics industry is to remain competitive as similar and affordable products manufactured in China enter the market and given the constant competition from similar companies such as Sony.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Samsung Malaysia Electronics (SME) Malaysia Sdn Bhd
Address:
3B-9-7 Level 9 Block 3B Jln Stesen Sentral 5 Kuala Lumpur 50470
Tel:
603-22636731
Fax:
603-22636759
www:
www.samsung.com.my
Activities:
Global market leader and manufacturer of consumer electronics, LCDs and various home appliances
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, Trade press



2005
2006
2007
Net sales
RM1.1 million
RM1.4 million
RM2 million
Net profit
> RM700,000
RM1 million
> RM1 million
Number of employees
2,200
> 2,200
> 2,200
Source:           Trade press, Company research



Company Background

·         Samsung Malaysia Electronics (SME) Malaysia is part of a larger group under its parent company, Samsung Corp, which is established in Korea. Samsung Malaysia Electronics was set up to cater for the local market in Malaysia as well as be a subsidiary office to deal with marketing and consumer services for Samsung Electronics products and appliances.
·         Samsung currently imports, distributes and manufactures various consumer electronic products and home electrical appliances. Its broad range of products also includes semiconductors, mobile phones.
·         Being a global market leader and manufacturer of consumer electronics, Samsung has a wide variety of consumer and home electronics to cater to almost every consumer. Samsung Electronics is the global market leader in more than 60 products, including digital displays such as LCD displays, plasma displays and OLED displays; home electronics equipment such as TVs, DVD players, Blu-ray players, home cinema systems, set-top boxes and projectors; and mobile devices such as mobile phones, mp3 players, digital cameras and camcorders.
·         Currently the company is increasing its workforce due to high demands for consumer electronics in the market. This is due to new technologies being introduced and the company is taking advantage of this by innovating new products.
·         The company’s headquarters is located in Kuala Lumpur. It has various authorised distributors around Malaysia, which are responsible to distributing to retailing companies such as electrical stores and specialised stores. Kuala Lumpur is a key cities of concentration due to its regional customer base and influence.
·         One of the latest activities from Samsung was the sponsorship of the Malaysian leg of the World Cyber Games (WCG) 2008. As the worldwide sponsor of WCG since 2000, Samsung has continued to support these values via its commitment of contributing to the community and promoting the spirit of cyber gaming. The company's sponsorship of WCG is aimed at providing a platform for youths to express themselves
·         In terms of new product launches, Samsung has introduced the concept of 'Purer Living', which was taken to a completely new level with the launch of Samsung Malaysia's range of digital home appliances. Unveiled for the first time at the Samsung Home Appliances Road show 2008, the new range of innovative products showcased Samsung’s ongoing effort to enhance every aspect of consumers' well-being and health, whilst capturing a larger segment of the refrigerator and washing machine categories.


Production

·         Currently in Malaysia, Samsung Electronics has two manufacturing plants, namely Samsung Electronics (M) Sdn Bhd (SEMA), located in Port Klang, and Samsung Electronics Display (M) Sdn Bhd (SDMA), located in Seremban, Senawang, Negeri Sembilan.
·         Samsung Electronics currently manufactures components for its own brand in Malaysia and it does not manufacture for any other brand in Malaysia.
·         Samsung Electronics’ presence is due to the fact that consumers in Malaysia are aware of this brand, which offers numerous consumer electronics and household appliances. This has resulted in it having a big influence among other brands in the market.
·         Samsung Electronics currently has no plans to export to neighbouring countries as the manufacturing facilities set up in Malaysia is mainly to cater for the needs of consumers in Malaysia.


Competitive Positioning

·         Currently the company is in the market with its core activities of manufacturing, distributing and importing. As it is already involved in the above categories, and with factories set up to manufacture various consumer and home electronics, Samsung currently has no interest in other markets.
·         The company has a wide product portfolio which caters to almost every age ranging from young adults interested in consumer electronics to professionals looking for high-end consumer electronics with sophisticated functions.
·         In order to capture a wider range of customers with its products, Samsung positions itself mostly in the mid-end market and the low-end market. In terms of low-end market, it has affordable consumer electronic products such as basic mobile phones and CRT TVs for the mass market usage.
·         With a large presence in the electronic and electrical field, the company is a leader and also responsible for innovation in the market due to its large customer base all over the world. It plans to innovate and become a leader for consumer and home appliances products in the market.
·         Samsung is currently commanding about 40% of the share in the consumer electronics market, making it the leading company in 2008. Its shares have been growing due to constant innovation and competitive pricing of its products.
·         Samsung is currently setting new heights with more products being launched to capture a better market share.
·         Being a large company that manufactures, distributes and imports, Samsung is now positioned to be in a growing segment due to its constant launch of new products. The company has positioned itself in the more mature market; it has also overtaken some of its competitors in terms of market position and sales as a result of its strategic business ideas.

·         Samsung Electronics now enjoys strategic partnerships with many leading companies outside Korea. It aims to foster an atmosphere of openness and mutual benefit with other leaders in the world electronics industry to co-develop products that will enhance the quality of people's lives.

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by admin @ Dermatology Incorporated

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Videocon Industries Ltd - Consumer Electronics - India

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

 Videocon Industries Ltd - Consumer Electronics - India

Videocon Industries Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         VIL is expected to drop non-performing brands and focus on profitable components of its business as part of a major restructuring process.
·         The founding Dhoot family has global ambitions for Videocon, and there is a focus on core sectors like energy, telecom and retail.  
·         In the consumer electronics sector, the company faces a strong challenge from multinational brands that can spend more on R&D and advertising. VIL recognises that it has a strong, well-recognised brand in Videocon, and this will help it in its push into smaller markets.  Diversifying into allied businesses like DTH, mobile phones and durable goods retailing though its NEXT chain are all expected to provide synergies for the company in the Indian consumer electronics market.
·         Since 2004, VIL’s strategy in consumer goods has focused on brand acquisition. While its main brand is Videocon, within India it is also the NBO for Sansui, Akai, Toshiba, Electrolux, Allwyn, Kelvinator and Hyundai, as well as for its own second brand, Kenstar. The brands with presences in consumer electronics sectors are Videocon, Sansui, Toshiba and Akai. Kenstar entered the market for high-end TVs in 2006, and it uses the other brands in the white goods market. VIL’s multi-brand strategy is quite different from other companies in India, which typically operate under single umbrella brands. Regardless, this has given the company a dominant share of volume sales, which strengthens its hand in negotiations with retailers. This strategy is under review and may change in 2009, with brands like Hyundai being axed from the consumer electronics range.
·         In 2008, Videocon reported that it had been given land in Navi Mumbai for a proposed LCD plant, and it is likely to begin operating in three years.  The company is expected to continue to reorganise, streamline its brands and businesses and expand into global markets.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Videocon Industries Ltd
Address:
Auto Cars Compound, Adalat Road, Aurangabad, Maharashtra 431005, India
Tel:
(+91) 2431 251501/2/3/4
Fax:
(+91) 2431 251551
www:
www.videoconworld.com
Activities:
Manufacture, marketing and distribution of consumer electronics products and home appliances; also oil and gas exploration
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, Trade press



2006
2007
Net sales (Rs million)
75,803
87,102
Net profit (Rs million)
8,188
8,578
Source:           Trade press, Company research, Audited company results,
Note:               Figures are for stand-alone Videocon Industries Ltd

·         VIL was founded by the Dhoot family. The company was one of India’s leading brands for appliances and white goods in the 1980s. Videocon International was the flagship company, but the group had a host of subsidiaries and joint ventures. In 2005, there was a major restructuring in the organisation and Videocon International merged with Videocon Industries, which is now the group’s flagship company. The Dhoots continue to hold the controlling interest.
·         VIL is present in the television and home audio and cinema markets, as well as in portable audio market. 
·         The company’s new Chairman has been quoted as saying that Videocon’s workforce will be cut by as much as 50% in the upcoming restructuring process.  Press reports state that the company has 6,000 staff in the home appliances business alone.
·         VIL has a strong dealer network across the country, and it is now also building the retail chain Next.
·         Videocon is on the threshold of entering the direct-to-home (DTH) broadcasting sector in India. It also has a finger in the telecom pie, and it has announced that it will spend Rs 8 billion over the next three years to expand its retail business.


Production

·         Videocon operates eight plants and uses another fifteen plants located across the country as OEM suppliers.  It is looking to increase its manufacturing base in India.
·         VIL has made its plant at Siliguri, West Bengal, into the export hub for its colour TV business. Exports of finished products are sent mainly to neighbouring countries. The Siliguri plant went into production in 2006 with an annual production capacity of 100,000 colour TVs.
·         Since its acquisition of Thomson SA’s manufacturing facilities, VIL now also has a world-wide manufacturing presence. While these facilities are currently used to manufacture components or to engage in R&D, VIL is likely to reorganise and streamline their production.
·         VIL currently manufactures and distributes other brands, such as Akai, Sansui and Hyundai, in India.  It is also selling products under the private label Next in its retail chain.
·         In 2007-08, VIL exported almost a half million analogue colour TV sets.  The group also supplied one million small-sized television sets to the Tamil Nadu government for distribution under the free TV scheme.

Product
Brand
Annual production
TV sets and sub-assemblies
Videocon, Akai, Sansui, Hyundai, Next
31 million
Audio and other electrical and electronic appliances
Videocon, Akai, Sansui, Hyundai, Next
0.4 million
Source:           Trade press, Company research, Trade interviews,



Competitive Positioning

·         Videocon is the largest brand in the Indian consumer electronics sector. It has a strong presence in home appliances.
·         The company is licensed as an NBO for other brands, including Akai and Sansui.
·         With a volume share of 2.7% in 2007, VIL ranked sixth in the Indian consumer electronics market.  However, its overall share has been shrinking and is down from a share of 5.6% in 2004. This is due to the company being dominant for so long in “old technology” subsectors like VCRs, VCD players, cassette players and analogue TVs.
·         The company is a late entrant in the race to develop new digital products, such as LCD and plasma TVs, DVD players and digital audio products.  VIL has had to play catch-up with other well-entrenched brands in these product categories. The company has just launched its Integra range of digital TVs, which the company hopes will boost growth.
·         The company is positioned in the middle of the market, above direct imports, private labels and small regional brands but below the Korean multinationals and Sony.
·         In 2009, the company is expected to make a full-fledge entry into DTH services, another high-growth and competitive subsector in the Indian television market.

Product type
Volume share
Rank
TVs and Projectors
17%
2
VCRs and DVD Players
7.6%
3
Home audio and cinema
7.1%
2
Portable media players
8.9%
4
Source:           Euromonitor International


National Cheat Sheet: Online RE investment platform scores funding from Steven Cohen, Florida suspends construction rules to rebuild post-Irma … & more

by Jamie @ The Real Deal New York

AlphaFlow scores investment from Steven Cohen’s VC fund Online real estate investment platform AlphaFlow raised $4.1 million in a seed funding round this week. The investors were led by Steve Cohen’s Point72 Ventures and Resolute Ventures and included other big name tech funds. AlphaFlow buys residential bridge loans from crowdfunding companies and hard-money lenders and puts them on “an automated investment platform,” which allows institutions to invest in them. [TRD] Interest rates hold steady as […]

Outrun the Sun Race Against Melanoma

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The Outrun the Sun Race Against Melanoma is the largest race benefiting skin cancer education and melanoma research. The event will be held the evening of June 18, 2016 at Fort Benjamin Harrison State Park. Visit Outrun the Sun Race Against Melanoma to learn more and register. Dermatology, Inc. has long supported the mission of Outrun the Sun, Inc., [...]

Larry Gluck lands refi for 13 buildings

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

Larry Gluck’s Stellar Management refinanced a 13-building New York City mixed-use portfolio with a $105 million, five-year loan from Capital One, the company announced Monday. The list of buildings includes 11-15 West 123rd Street, 1061-1071 St. Nicholas Avenue, 604 West 162nd Street and 601-609 West 175th Street and spans more than 600 apartments along with retail and commercial space. Stellar said it has owned all 13 buildings for more than two decades. GCP Capital Group […]

Notify NYC program launches new phone app

Notify NYC program launches new phone app

by Kristine Garcia @ New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

NEW YORK – It’s the latest thing to come out of City Hall- it’s the new Notify NYC app. The app is the latest upgrade to the Notify NYC program and features real-time push notifications on any events or emergencies in your area. Notifications include weather-related issues such as hurricanes or blizzards, power outages in certain areas, or health risks such as West Nile virus or Legionnaire’s disease. Less catastrophic events such as suspended parking rules are included, as well. […]

Pioneer Electronics Inc - Consumer Electronics - US

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help




Pioneer Electronics Inc - Consumer Electronics - US

Pioneer Electronics Inc



Strategic Direction

·         Pioneer is recognized by consumers primarily for its audio products, in particular in-car systems. The company is trying to change this perception by adopting a premium strategy for its plasma televisions. Pioneer's recently launched global marketing and product development initiative, known as "Project Kuro," is expected to guide the company’s business strategy in the United States for the foreseeable future.
·         Pioneer’s goal with its upscale Kuro line is to deliver the ultimate viewing experience for consumers without focusing on price points and breaking away from the commoditized pricing which has plagued the industry. Not only can consumers expect to see more high-end plasma offerings from Pioneer, but the company is also venturing into the 1080p projector segment and LCD televisions.
·         Pioneer’s emphasis on producing high-end performance products rather than focusing on volume and price is clearly evident in its retailing strategy. To maintain the high-end image incorporated under the Project Kuro initiative, the company intends to distribute the Pioneer brand through established retailers such as Best Buy, excluding warehouse club channels and other price-driven mass merchant retailers. In addition, consumers will see more merchandising space dedicated to Pioneer products at Best Buy locations, where featured products will include the Pioneer 1080p plasma television set, receiver, speaker system and Blu-ray Disc player. The company's high-end Elite brand will be reserved for A/V specialty dealers and custom installers. Moreover, Pioneer is expected to launch more company-operated stores in the United States.
·         Pioneer will continue to forge ahead in the development of in-car audio and navigation systems. The company is expected to put a greater emphasis on voice command for in-car audio and navigation systems, a technology that is emerging as a key feature for in-car consumer electronics products.
·         The 2007 agreement between Sharp and Pioneer involving collaboration on the development of next-generation DVDs, audio, car electronics and television displays will likely begin to bear fruit in the US market sometime in 2009. Pioneer-branded LCD displays supplied from Sharp have already been introduced in Europe in 32-inch, 37-inch and 46-inch sizes, and similar products are expected to be launched in the US market sometime in 2009, targeting secondary room applications.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc
Address:
2265 E. 220th Street, Long Beach, California 90810, USA
Tel:
+1 310-952-2000
www:
www.pioneerusa.com
Activities:
In-home and in-car consumer electronics
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, Trade press



2005
2006
2007
Net sales (company-wide)
¥754.9 billion
¥797.1 billion
¥774.4 billion
Net profit (company-wide)
¥ (85,758)
¥ (6,761)
¥ (17,992)
Number of employees (company-wide)
38,826
37,622
42,775
Source:           Trade press, Company research



Company Background

·         Since its founding in 1938, Japan-based Pioneer has evolved from being a simple audio speaker manufacturer to a global supplier of innovative consumer electronics. These products span a broad spectrum of electronics, and they include large-screen plasma TVs, DVD recorders, DVD players, stereo systems, other audio/video components and in-car entertainment/navigation devices.
·         Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc. is headquartered in Long Beach, California, and it is a subsidiary of Pioneer Corporation. The company established its North American operations in 1972.
·         For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2008, Pioneer Corporation reported lower operating revenue, operating income and a higher net loss. Consolidated operating revenue decreased 2.8% to US$7.7 billion, mainly a result of lower plasma display and DVD recorder sales. This decline occurred despite increased sales of DVD drives, Blu-ray disc-related devices, car audio products and car navigation systems.
·         Sales of aftermarket audio products declined in North America, and OEM sales rose. Sales of aftermarket in-car navigation devices remained steady while OEM sales increased. As for in-home consumer electronics, sales declined by 8.8% to reach US$3.3 billion. The decrease in sales was largely the result of declining demand for plasma televisions, mainly in North America and Europe.
·         Pioneer forms part of the second-tier of global manufacturers in the consumer electronics market, following industry leaders Sony, Matsushita and Philips.


Production

·         Through its production facility in Springboro, Ohio, Pioneer supplies OEM mobile entertainment products to various vehicle manufacturers including Ford, General Motors, Toyota and Honda.
·         The company’s other production facility, located in Pomona, California, is slated to be closed by the end of March 2009. The company plans to replace the Pomona operation with supplies from Japan.


Competitive Positioning

·         The television subsector is facing an unprecedented level of competition as established brands, such as Pioneer, battle it out with low-priced Chinese and private label brands. Margins continue to fall on sales of televisions as retail pricing gets squeezed. At the same time, Pioneer must also contend with the encroachment of LCD televisions into the 40-inch and 50-inch arenas, traditionally the domain of plasma televisions. As the pricing gap between large LCD and plasma televisions continues to shrink, it is expected that most consumers will turn to LCD, given its higher resolution.
·         Despite the challenges facing plasma televisions, Pioneer continues to aggressively push the technology. In 2008, Pioneer launched a number of new 1080p Kuro plasma televisions in its Pioneer and Elite lines that are much thinner than previous versions. Pioneer is trying to capitalize on the growing demand for increasingly thin flat-panel television sets.
·         To support its television launch, Pioneer also unveiled its next-generation Blu-ray disc players as well as its new Elite series of A/V receivers priced at more than US$1,000. These efforts are an attempt by Pioneer to position the company as a high-performance supplier of home theatre equipment. The company is trying to aggressively promote the entire audio/visual experience to consumers.
·         These marketing and promotion initiatives are all a part of Pioneer’s new global re-branding and product development initiative, Project Kuro. In fact, the company is set to launch the second leg of its fully integrated global advertising campaign behind the project Kuro strategy, wherein Pioneer will stress the emotional experience involved when using Pioneer products at home. Aiming for high-end entertainment enthusiasts, Pioneer’s television campaign will run on national cable channels, including ESPN, as well as in print media with advertisements in Esquire, Men's Health and Wired magazines.
·         Faced with a slowing US economy in 2008, Pioneer found itself challenged in its attempts to sell high-end in-home consumer electronics products. However, the company faced even greater challenges in the in-car segment as US vehicle sales plummeted during the year with Pioneer’s OEM business suffering as a result. The aftermarket subsector also faced difficulties as many car owners were reluctant to spend money on in-car vehicle upgrades. Regardless, Pioneer continues to focus on new product development for aftermarket products. As noted, the company is paying particular attention to enhancing voice command technology for use in both in-car audio and navigation devices.

Product Type
Volume Share
Rank
In-car Media Players
15.0%
2
In-car Speakers
16.0%
2
In-car Navigation Systems
3.9%
5
Other in-car Consumer Electronics
10.0%
2
Source:           Euromonitor International


Canon Inc - Consumer Electronics - Japan

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Canon Inc - Consumer Electronics - Japan


Canon Inc



Strategic Direction

·         Canon aims to strengthen existing business, expand operations through diversification as well as identify next generation products to assure higher sales beyond 2010, while maintaining a high profit margin structure. Improving future performance would mean joining the ranks of the global top 100 companies by 2010, which would translate to ¥6,000 billion and net income to sales ration of 10% or more.
·         Canon wants to head towards the accomplishment of the Excellent Global Corporation Plan which focused on higher profits, offering attractive and timely products and effectively reducing costs. It pursues key innovation activities, such as strengthening supply chain management, increasing in-house production, enhancing automated production and improving the efficiency procurement process in order to reduce costs.
·         While experiencing favourable consumer market demands in the domestic market, Canon’s main challenge stems from the international setbacks which include the increase in prices of raw materials and fuel costs and the slowdown in the US economy. Demands in Europe and China turned our brisk. Canon has lost its battle to be ranked in the overall consumer electronics market due to its focus on portable electronic products.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Canon Corporation
Address:
30-2, Shimomaruko 3-chome, Ota, Tokyo
Tel:
(033) 758-2111
Fax:
0354829680302
www:
http://www.canon.com/
Activities:
The Company is a manufacturer of digital multifunction devices plain paper copying machines, laser beam printers, inkjet printers, cameras and steppers.
Source:           2008 Canon Corporation, 2008 Euromonitor from trade press



2005
2006
2007
Net sales
¥3,754,191
¥4,156,759
¥4,481,346
Net profit
384,096
707,033
756,673
Number of employees
115,583
118,99
131,352
Source:           2005-2007 Canon Corporation annual report, 2008 Euromonitor estimates
Note:               Consolidated data (domestic and international operations) so, may not reflect the domestic standing of the company in the CE market



Company Background

·         Canon Corporation is a Japanese multinational corporation that specialises in imaging and optical products, including cameras, photocopiers and computer printers.
·         Although Canon is active in the market for cameras and computer printers, it is also involved in other markets such as analogue and digital copiers, and it has a line of digital multifunction devices.
·         In 2004, Canon Corp ventured to the digital displays market by teaming up with Toshiba to develop and manufacture flat panel televisions based on SED, a new type of display technology. The joint venture company was called SED Inc.
·         In January 2007, Canon bought Toshiba's share of the joint venture following litigation from Nano-Proprietary, Inc, which claimed Canon breached a license agreement by sharing technology licensed to Canon with the joint venture company.
·         Canon acquired majority ownership of Tokki Corporation and expects the latter’s advanced technology related to production equipment for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays to contribute considerably toward the development of Canon products. The company also reached an agreement with Hitachi Ltd to acquire shares with the aims of advancing display technologies, ensuring stable procurement of LCD panels used in Canon products, accelerating its OLED display development and facilitating product development.
·         Recognising the importance of the workforce as key to the success of the efficient production and operation of the company, Canon Corp has increased its labour force. This is also part of the on-going drive of the company towards the engagement of other potential market segments, which need the skills of new employees.


Production

·         Canon Corp has 37 manufacturing companies both in Japan and overseas and supplies the local market from within country. The company maintains a non-disclosure policy, however, on its production data.
·         Canon increased it production to meet growing demand for its products worldwide and put considerable amount of weight on the expansion of its production facilities based on a long-term perspective. In Vietnam, Canon completed construction of its second inkjet printer plant in 2007 and commenced full-scale operations in 2008.
·         It completed a construction of a facility for inkjet cartridge production at Oita Canon Materials Inc in Japan in 2007. Canon raised the production capacity of interchangeable single lens reflex (SLR).
·         It has taken steps to expand production capacity for inkjet printers. Canon made plans to build a new plant in Hita, Oita in 2008. At Canon Precision Inc. in Aomori, Japan, the Company began construction in 2007 of a plant to manufacture toner cartridges for printers and copying machines. Commencing operations in 2008, the plant incorporates automated assembly lines to significantly raise productivity levels.
·         Canon exports to other regional markets such as North America, Europe, Latin America, Southeast Asia and Russia but maintains export preferences from region to region. Sales of medium- and high-grade MFPs stayed on course in Japan and Australia, with robust results in the Americas, Europe and Asia for SFPs and low-end MF. In laser beam printers (LBPs), Canon aggressively exported to North America, Europe, China, India, the Middle East, Russia and Eastern Europe,
·         Canon also is taking major steps to bolster in-house production of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensors, a key component in digital cameras and digital video camcorders. Specifically, Canon will establish a new facility for CMOS development through production in Kawasaki, Japan.


Competitive Positioning

·         Canon is poised towards expanding digital single lens reflex (SLR) camera market, as well as the compact digital camera, copy machine and laser beam printer (LBP) markets. It markets a wide product portfolio and positions itself in the high end of market.
·         The company is strengthening its activities in the development of such key components and devices as CMOS sensors and DigitalImagingIC (DIGIC) imaging processors for digital cameras and IR controllers for multifunction devices (MFDs). Further enhancing and accelerating development, the company successfully incorporated such key components and devices into new products throughout 2007.
·         Canon ranked 9th in the overall consumer electronics market in Japan in 2007, reflecting 1.9% of the total volume demands.
·         By leveraging Canon’s strengths in advanced technologies for optics, sensing, image processing, simulation and software, the company was able to increase shares of digital cameras, buoyed by the introduction of beginner and mid-level models.
·         Canon successfully increased its market share in compact digital cameras as well as a sound growth in digital video cameras. In 2007, the market for inkjet printers continued to shift from single-function printers (SFPs) to multifunction printers (MFPs). As a result, MFP sales increased primarily on a unit basis, while the SFP market contracted in excess of expectations. Against this backdrop, unit sales of Canon’s inkjet printers increased slightly
·         As an innovator in the market, Canon Corp is accumulating technologies and conducting highly advanced research internally or in collaboration with leading universities and institutes. In 2007 Canon identified medical imaging and robotics as new business domains and made advanced collaborative research with Kyoto University in Japan with the aim of developing innovative diagnostic imaging devices.
·         Canon is interested in both niche positions and market leadership. In 2007, Canon relies on the innovative concept of cross-media imaging and a sophisticated combination of input and output devices in order to increase synergies among Canon’s products and raise their added value.
·         By increasing research and development expenditure by ¥60 billion from the previous fiscal year to ¥368.3 billion, accounting for 8.2% of net sales, Canon hopes to improve technological advancements. It also develops and promotes “cross-media imaging”, a concept that, through interactive connectivity, enables advanced synergies between such input and output devices such as cameras, printers and displays. Cross-media imaging allows users to communicate and reproduce a variety of images and information

Sector
Value share
Rank
Portable consumer electronics
3.0
9
Source:           2008 Euromonitor International
Note:               Shares for in-home and in-car were comparably negligible compared to competing brands







Consumer Electronics Market in Mexico

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

 Consumer Electronics Market in Mexico-Dissertation Writing Help



Executive Summary


Outstanding Performance of the Sector in the Middle of Recession


The highly positive performance of the market of consumer electronics throughout 2008 was an asset by the time the American and then international financial recession strongly hit Mexico’s economic activities overall in the last trimester of 2008. By the end of the year, authorities recognised that the Mexican economy was decelerating, which was confirmed by the decreasing GDP growth for 2008 (3.3%, compared to 4.8% in 2007).

However, the growth of the sector in 2008 had an outstanding performance in respect to 2007, growing from 3% volume growth in 2007 to almost 23% in 2008. In the context of strong momentum in Mexico, where analogue technologies are being increasingly left behind throughout the entire sector, market value has been driven up through products with higher value added and thus, characterised by higher unit prices.

High-income Segment Influences Healthy Market Performance


Behind the maximum historic level in volume and value growth reached in the last five years by consumer electronics sector, there is the backup of the highly strengthened subsector of portable consumer electronics, thanks to the refreshing proposals from portable media players, camcorders and mobile phones. Many product innovations in 2008 were mainly high end, with premium prices and targeting middle- and high-income consumers, like iPhones, pivotal not only to maintaining a satisfactory level but to surpass expectations of the sector’s performance in 2008.

Consumers Cling To Refreshing Proposals of Premium Digital Gadgets


According to the National Association of Selfservice and Department Stores (ANTAD), sales of electronic digital articles, video and cell phones grew more than perishables or clothing. Indeed, subsectors most demanded by Mexican consumers in 2008 were mobile phones, portable media players (mainly portable multimedia, DVD and MP3 players), digital camcorders and digital TVs. A common denominator underlying all these categories is the quickly changing lifestyles, which is pushing consumers to embrace more digitalised technologies as a status symbol and full integration to the modern rhythm of life, especially in double-income households where parents aim to provide the best they possibly can for the integral education, socialisation and entertainment of their children and of themselves.

Competition Only Within Professional Players


A considerable emphasis on new digital product developments or commercialisation, more attractive promotions, credits or payment facilities, together with enhanced distribution was the focus of both, leading and emerging players in the consumer electronics market. In this way, the competitive environment tightened and left no space for improvisation, last-minute decisions or unprepared market responses. The concentration of competition amongst multinational companies, was however dynamic in 2008, by the challenge of players to strengthen and diversify their proposals to the Mexican market in fast-growing and high-potential subsectors (like portable multimedia players or the newest generations of mobile phones), in an attempt to position themselves or gain market share.

Positive Outlook for the Sector


Despite the recession in the United States, having a strong impact on several Mexican sectors and industries, it is not expected to downsize the consumer electronics market. On the contrary, total volume sales during 2008–2013 are expected to triple the ones during 2003–2008, while value sales are estimated to be 2.4 times greater. Reasons behind this are, for example, that high-income consumers are one of the main targets of hi-tech innovations, and middle-income consumers can easily approach those high-end products (like multifunctional mobile phones) through the availability of credit or payment facilities. Also, companies will start acquiring awareness of the increasing growth of internet retailing during the forecast period, as through their ultimate technologies they are appealing for a young generation which understands a lot of electronic media and is highly familiarised with modern means of communication and commerce-making.


Key Trends and Developments


Unique Potential Demographic Bonus With Younger Generations and Double-income Families Redefining the Sector


In 2008 we find in Mexico 106.7 million inhabitants, 8.4% more than in year 2000 and equivalent to a 1% annual growth in average annually since then. According to projections done by CONAPO (National Council of Population) a demographic bonus is occurring in Mexico between 2000 and 2030, reaching 121 million inhabitants and a number of people of prime working age (25–54 years) increasing at a far greater pace than before.

It is foreseen that these developments will bring to the labour force a widened pool of 730,000 workers in average annually, translating into more people enabled to strengthen their disposable incomes and destine them, for example, to buy a modest apartment or enter into bigger credit agreements to acquire a new house, and to purchase or update their electronic technologies. For the consumer electronics market, this implies increasing sales and product development opportunities.

Current impact


The significant growth of the population reaching working age is expanding the potential market. The market is becoming more competitive with stronger tension between price and quality. Companies are working towards specialisation, aiming for the fulfilment of market niches associated with advances in technology. Innovations means products are becoming more multifunctional and also responding more to how people live.  For example, Sony, one of the leaders in home audio and cinema products, launched in 2008 a home cinema set HT-IS100, characterised by the smallest loudspeakers on the market, (with a diameter of 1.7 inches), catering for the necessities of couples or families living in small properties with small room dimensions.

Mexican consumer demographics is changing, as more women have entered the labour market, bringing more disposable income into the household. For example, women are showing increasing interest towards portable laptops, mobile phones and MP3s with stylish designs. All in all, as the number of single-income families is falling, there is a significant correlation between the predominance of both working parents and the reliance on modern and desirably, multifunctional consumer electronic appliances.

Outlook


Mexico has traditionally been a young country demographically. However, the over 40s segment is fast expanding thus stimulating demand for consumer electronics. This segment will represent 13.9% of the total population by 2020.

Working women are likely to adopt personal gadgets as style statements. Also, the rising affluence and lifestyle changes of urban centred families will soon result in a new class of consumer with greater spending power. Many of the purchasing decisions will be influenced by the younger members of the family who will be familiar with the new generation of consumer electronics. Thus, in years to come, the teen segment is expected to contribute more to the overall dynamism of the market. It is predicted that an increasing number of manufacturers will latch on to this growing consumer group by designing products that are both appealing to both these population segments.

Future Impact


By year 2030, forecasts show that from a total population of more than 121 million inhabitants in Mexico, 91 million will be located in urban areas, which means cities of more than 15,000 inhabitants. This will be a key driver pushing up demand for new houses and thus, for consumer electronics.

Considering that the pool of potential workers will see a sizeable increase, accounting for nearly 43% of the national population in 2020 (compared with only 27.4% in 1980), reliance on consumer electronics will strengthen within modern households, where there will be both parents working or single employed professionals.

This scenario will be complemented by more single urban households of young professionals with access to more credit (or the social benefit money in INFONAVIT), as employment rates continue rising.

Looking further ahead, as well as an increase in middle-income families, the expansion of the 65+ population will urge consumer electronic manufacturers to focus on the convergence of technology with user friendly appliances, taking into consideration that Mexico is a country where more than 80% of the population has an average education of elementary school and very advanced devices would be under utilised. Through successful marketing as well as through targeted promotions tailored to individual consumers, manufacturers could see the sector becoming an important host of new applications, while retailers may see volume sales increase dramatically as consumers grow more familiar with a new generation of consumer electronics.

Credit Options: An Ally To the Sector


While access to credit by the low-income population has been fundamental to promoting the economic growth of the country, in the last five years formal employment has experienced growth of 17.5%, having a direct impact on a fostered internal consumption. New consumers now have access for the first time to markets such as motorcars, housing, domestic electrical appliances and consumer electronics. Also, since 2006, credit cards from commercial banks are more accessible to low-income households in Mexico. Since then, credit to consumption shows elevated growth levels. Also store credit cards are competing directly with bank credit cards, although offering higher interest rates.

Although the global credit crisis has tightened up access to credit, in 2008 it was still fairly easy for consumers to gain credit when compared to previous years which helped boost sales of durable goods in Mexico. Overall, for the consumer electronics market, many facilities of credit exist for the purchase of both large consumables like plasma TVs, blu-ray DVDs or a desktop computer and also for small appliances like cameras, a portable MP3 player or a mobile phone.

Current impact


The Association of Banks in Mexico revealed that the emission of credit cards by commercial banks has been extended to a phenomenal level. By the first quarter of 2008, 22 million credit cards were circulating, which means a rise of 134% in respect to the existing 9.4 million credit cards just 3 years before. This must be seen within a context where the number of households living in poverty has decreased from the high level of 12.4 million households in 1998, to less than 9.3 in 2008. Also, families stepping into the medium socioeconomic class have increased to more than 13.3 million in 2008, whereas they were 7.9 million in year 2000.

Some bank and store credit cards have increased their offer of not having to pay back anything until several months later and with no interest. Also, the monthly bank statements often include information on promotions to buy mobile phones, TVs, digital cameras or DVD players, inviting their card members to enjoy extended payment deadlines.

Another indirect mode of credit has been created by one of the main telecommunications enterprises, Telmex which customers can buy online from their website. Internauts and Telmex’s clients can look for a display of consumer electronics, which include laptops of different brands (Hewlett-Packard, Lanix, Dell, etc.), GPS navigation systems, computer peripherals (like webcams) and speakers for iPods. With their monthly telephone bills arriving home, consumers meet with new publicity, at the time they are informed of the payment amount due for that particular month, added to the rest of the telephone bill.

Outlook


Credit authorities in Mexico, namely the CONDUSEF (Comisión Nacional para la Protección y Defensa de los Usuarios de Servicios Financieros), has reported that 60% of bank issued credit card holders have the habit of making the minimum payment due every month. Thus, Mexican consumers can be expected to wind up paying lingering sums for their purchases as also retailers keep extending credit options even for small consumer electronics (especially variety stores, supermarket, and departmental stores), in order to keep sales up. This strategy aims to better encounter two factors in the next five years: firstly, the increasing prices that might push down retail consumption in general (even more towards non-essential products), and secondly, the fact that low-income consumers account for 60% of total Mexican households, and still cannot gain credit.

Still, strong positive growth is expected for credit and store credit cards in the forecast period. The financial cards sector has the total support of the government in continuing its strong growth well into the forecast period, as having the option of using financial instruments helps reduce the need and expense of printing money.

Yet, a big risk underlies this monetary public and personal management. According to the CONDUSEF, an estimated 10% of the individual credit card holders have eight or more credit cards and the average line of credit for each account is pegged at MX$2,800. Taking into consideration that the percentage of all consumer bank loans registered as non-paying grew from 6% in 2006 to 10% by March 2008, the increase of financial cards dissemination gives an added risk of faulty payments. Despite acknowledging this, retailers will not cease offering credit for consumer electronics, as they prefer keeping low inventory costs and securing sales somehow. Low- and middle-income consumers are expected to use the cards for durable goods, especially during an economic recession. 

Future impact


Whereas the consumer credit sector helped drive the Mexican economy during the last five years, obstacles are expected to start emerging within this monetary context where credit interest rates are going up rapidly. On the contrary, bankers disagree with CONDUSEF, who has denounced that the Mexican consumers’ credit card debts will soon chill the Mexican economy. Whichever position they defend, it is a fact that an increase in bad credit card debts is worrisome for the national economy, as it means there could be a generation of Mexicans who are not eligible for credit and is listed with the Credit Bureau, implying they may not be able to buy big ticket goods and may cause a contraction within the future consumer electronics sector.

A linear consequence of strengthening the financial cards market would help consumer electronics volume sales, by preventing it from severely declining but at least keep moderate growth for 2009–2013. Still, price instability is another factor to consider due to several steep commodity price hikes (like steel) and a moderate GDP growth (already weaker in 2008 than expected: 3.3% instead of more than 4.5%). Thus, credit might be at stake in the upcoming years.

Financial card service companies will continue to target low income households to acquire credit cards. As this is the widest consumer base in Mexico, manufacturers of consumer electronics can count on high penetration rates in the future.

Cocooning As An Emerging Lifestyle


As people travel less outside of their homes as a reaction to the tough external conditions and a bleaker world preferences for in-home entertainment have vastly grown (and improved by manufacturers), with technologies such as high-definition TVs, DVDs and blu-ray, easier and quicker downloads, large screen TVs and cinema style sound systems.

In addition, consumers have been creating a mode of “outdoor cocooning” with the use of personal gadgets like mobile phones and media players being a form of shutting off their physical surroundings and entering their own world – just as they do when they shut the door at home.

Current impact


Although a global mindset fixed on the world’s financial market difficulties is influencing Mexican consumers to downscale their spending behaviours, the consumer electronics sectors is less affected than other sectors. This is mainly due to electronic products delivering to the consumer either entertainment or communication services that provide the escapism and comfort that consumers cherish in difficult times. With money tight and life tough, consumers are flocking to personal high-end gadgets like digital cameras, multifunctional mobile phones or powerful laptops, or turning to DVDs and blu-ray films, HD TVs, large flat screens, high-quality sound systems – all providing superior in-home entertainment and to find escapism in the company of others or alone.

The large screen and superior sound of cinemas, for example, is increasingly imitated by home cinema products and encouraging Mexican consumers to invite friends and family home for group viewing. To a large extent, the whole concept of a group or a gathering form of entertainment has been replaced by the personal comfort of cocooning at home, which also leaves the door open to socialising.

Outlook


As the intense product development and the adequate marketing and sales campaigns from consumer electronic firms is facilitating the products’ affordability to consumers, electronics entertainment and communication devices will become part of the cocooning experience, allowing consumers to feel not only protected and secure at home (even more so in big cities, like Mexico City, where there are constant dangers and traffic chaos), but also entertained and in contact with friends and the world through the comfort of being at home with the possibility of staying away fron the impersonal, harsh life outside.

The cocooning phenomenon will take Mexicans closer to the global trend of developing online communities from the comfort of their sofa by calling, texting, e-mailing and exchanging photos with friends or members of an online community to keep in touch. This will further stimulated by the proliferation of the booming single person household in Mexico, and within the younger generations, familiar with the modern processes of staying in touch with society without leaving their homes.

Most high-income households, together with the segment of successful professionals will increasingly tend towards creating their own room in their homes providing all what is necessary to build up their entertainment corner or small home office, which again, will create a constant and fresh demand for basic laptops, routers, mobiles and other computer peripherals.

Future impact


For previous generations, an emphasis on cocooning might have been seen as coming with a social cost (not meeting family and friends), but the new generations of Mexicans will be far more geared up to keeping in touch via devices with beloved people, and will not see this as unusual.

For those belonging mostly to the middle- and high-income levels, a new paradigm might emerge, and will be the idea of people having the vital need to communicate and be entertained. The desire to communicate and find escapism in an impersonal and isolating world might start becoming essential and the norm. In term of consumer electronics demand, it is a market unlikely to go into reverse throughout the recession.

However, one transcendental issue will always be the price of digital and technological gadgets and devices. With technology moving so quickly and hardly leaving time for low-priced versions to take hold before the next must-have product is launched, it is highly likely that Mexico’s economic structure functions as a brake for the industry, provoking leading players to slow down with ground-breaking launches, giving time for consumers to catch up and expand the consumption of existing technologies. A consequence of this is that the major brand names may also be tempted to offer basic, no frills versions of their ranges – appealing to both the lower-income buyer and the more experienced user seeking a particular product at the lowest price.

These scenarios might all converge by strengthening the cocooning phenomenon in society, especially if low-priced technology substitutes with lower prices bring in new buyers and succeed in creating a larger base market for services and upgrades for consumer electronics in the future.

Convergence of Fashion and Technology Is A Crucial Component of Success


The digital revolution that started up in Mexico in the 1990s, when computers were brand new on the market and cars were considered the social status symbol par excellence (mainly of the male consumers), has now matured today into a personal tech goods market, which is adopted as a visible display of social status.

While state-of-the art-brands are essential to the younger, cooler buyer, older buyers realise too that the latest gadgets are not only useful, but enhance their own personality as “youthful” and “in touch”. A key element behind the social value of hi-tech goods is the fact that they attract male and female social trend-setting professional groups who are increasingly attracted to ultimate innovations of modern premium gadgets.

Current impact


Mexican consumers are increasingly escaping into affordable luxuries – which today include not only one-day spa therapies or short, de-stressing trips, but now also sleek, cool, personal tech goods.

In this context, fashion and technology have become a powerful combination, which serve as a major driving force in the introduction of new consumer electronic products in the Mexican market. Digital technology has marked a new era for the consumer electronics market as the launch of HD LCD televisions, hard-disk DVD players, home theatres and camcorders, MP3 players, the iPod, pocket PCs and navigation systems have expanded the market across all segments in recent years. Many of these new products have sleek designs and features that are tilted towards the preferences of the youth market and of the high-income segment (professional single men and women, and married couples in double-income households). For example, a premium device, such as the iPhone, is appearing as an essential style statement and one of the holy grails of brand marketing. Consumers who own such a product not only gain avant-garde services but also assure their self-esteem and social status amongst their peer group.

Thus, the latest tech gadgets are pushing the consumer electronics sector to be in a better state than most consumer sectors in surviving the recession. And for the higher-profile areas of the market, the news is that consumers appear ready to keep spending on hi tech goods and to support premium brands and prices – not only based on the product’s overall functionality – but mainly due to their sheer desirability.

Outlook


The consumer electronics market can be expected to focus on personal gadgets where design features will be a key selling point. Elegant styles in design, matched by easy, intuitive use, will be paramount to buyers. The big winner of the moment will be the iPhone, which has managed to significantly upgrade the mobile’s phone subsector by offering a high-profile multifunctional device serving as music player and even as a mini-computer (at least in terms of mobile web browsing and e-mail). It is likely that iPhones won’t encounter any stronger multifunctional competitor in the coming years. Additionally, the “iPhone” phenomenon in Mexico is expected to bring positive outcomes for the sector in general and for the mobile phones subsector in particular, as they have triggered an initial intense response from consumers, whose consequence of reactivating the sector will endure throughout the following years.

There will be a tight competitive landscape in the immediate future, as innovations and newer versions of products will be constantly launched that offer status-related services and the technological benefits that consumers value, as new icons are dictated by the new demands of modern lifestyles.

With all of these positive associations in the consumer’s mind, top line tech goods naturally will keep attracting a strong potential market, although surely they might not answer to the needs of budget buyers (to whom the solution will be however offered by mid-range, standard-priced gadgets.)

Future impact


As an advantage of the sector in the long term, the placebo effect of a belonging sentiment and feel good factor surrounding tech purchases will be strengthened in the forecast period. Personal technological gadgets will become a kind of new language in the long term, clearly saying something about the owner’s sense of style, personal spending power and being switched on to the modern tech world. Fostered sales of high-end multifunctional devices purchases will be increasingly justified in the consumer’s mind by covering several needs, although the real drivers will lie in self-esteem, confidence, peer group status and indulgence at a time of economic crisis and also sheer sexiness.

In a sector that often leads its consumers, creative firms and manufacturers will benefit significantly from this trend, as this will be translated into higher revenues and a type of “secure-shield” enabling the sector to assure long-term commercial success, as they have already gained the most difficult part of their tasks: high consumer interest.

Further consequences in the Mexican market for consumer electronics based on stylish designs with “look at me value” in a tech aware society, will be that mainly portable communications and computing devices will be set to spread into the mainstream consumer market in the long term.

Modern Aesthetics Refreshing the Market


The industry-led trend in in-home consumer electronics has materialised by hi-tech stylish proposals seen across retail showrooms, in magazines and internet advertisements during 2008. Vibrant silver, grey and black colours in sleek finishes have been a refreshing proposal to make the Mexican home appear more modern. Together with the payment facilities offered by some credit and store cards or directly from retailers, this is appealing especially amongst younger couples and single professionals updating their consumer electronics equipment.

In addition, small and large families are tempted to show openly in their own houses the connectivity of their devices, presenting every time more integrated systems such as the TVs-DVD players-home audio and cinema products. Today, beyond the basic entertainment function of these devices, consumer electronic products had become elements of home decoration displaying the modernity of Mexican homes.

Current impact


New company driven products featuring sleek designs in grey and black or silver are encouraging higher-income consumers in particular, to enter into purchasing the most avant-garde designs as a way of transforming their living rooms into a focal point of sharing and entertaining moments for the whole family, around TV-audio-home theatre sets.

However, with the aim of fulfilling all market niches Sony decided to adapt to the conditions of social housing and small apartments by launching a home cinema set HT-IS100, characterised by having the smallest loudspeakers of the market, with a diameter of 1.7 inches, catering for couples or families living in small dimension rooms.

Being highly promoted through television, print and internet media, consumer electronics have been marketed with the idea of creating a room dedicated to a home cinema system complete with plasma or LCD TVs with wide flat screens in brilliant black or silver finishes, allowing the projection of blu-ray DVDs and connected to stylish loudspeakers. Similarly, the message of creating of a home office containing a bundle of computer products and related peripherals has also been processed by marketing campaigns.  According to specialists, the aesthetics and elegance of these new consumer electronic products inspire people to show off their modern and harmonious integrated rooms with hi-tech appliances, unlike 20 years ago, when the trend was to hide or camouflage this kind of equipment behind closed doors.

Outlook


Leading companies will continue focusing on the concept of multi-functionality and more aesthetics amongst electronic products. Audio, visual and digital appliances are expected to continue being the most preferred by householders when they move house (even over white goods) or when they wish to furnish their homes with replacements.

This fashion of decorating homes using modern consumer electronic products, apart from helping to invigorate sales, will also help with the companies’ strategy to shorten replacement cycles by offering different designs and colours.

Although the traditional niche market for high end products has always been young, high-income consumers, an important extension of the consumer base for these products will be the middle-income consumers, who are following a smooth trend of gradual increase, according to the forecasts regarding the socioeconomic structure.

Future impact


There is a deep rooted tradition of Mexican families that is not expected to change, and furthermore will be strengthened: the experience of building and sharing family memories and moments by the family nucleus and extended branches of the family. Even the socialisation of homes of single people will be increasingly around consumer electronics, acting as a cohesive element for socialisation, education, communication and interaction amongst family members or friends, (in the context of a country like Mexico, where there are higher penetration rates for TVs than for washing machines.). This means that for Mexican households the trend will be towards updating their entertainment devices, like TVs and DVD players rather than white goods.

Social processes around technological devices will be increasing in the forecast period, mainly as analogue technologies are substituted for digital versions.

Thus, new product development of consumer electronics will be a driver feeding the trend, by offering new designs and components in the forecast period. 

Sanyo Electric Co Ltd - Consumer Electronics - Japan

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Sanyo Electric Co Ltd - Consumer Electronics - Japan

Sanyo Electric Co Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         Sanyo is expected to perform better after drastic structural reforms needed to clearly define its management plan. It wants to move towards becoming a leading provider of environment-and energy-related products and services, in line with its Medium-Term Management Plan. This is in line with the “Sanyo Evolution project.”
·         It is facing the challenge of finding the most appropriate structural reforms in audio-video products and home appliances and trying to offset loses by concentrating its management resources on its core businesses, such as power solutions, Heating-Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) products and commercial equipment and personal mobile devices.
·         As long as Sanyo can sustain efforts to push forward with structural reforms, such as streamlining, rebuilding and growing, the company should emerge as a successful market leader in the industry.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Sanyo Electric Co Ltd
Address:
5-5, Keihan-Hondori 2-chome, Moriguchi City, Osaka 570-8677, Japan
Tel:
+81 6 6991 1181
Fax:
+81 6 6992 0009
WWW:
www.sanyo.co.jp
Activities:
Power solutions, HVAC products and commercial equipment, personal mobile devices, televisions and projectors, camcorders and portable media players
Source:           Euromonitor International from Sanyo Electric Co Ltd



2003
2004
2005
Net sales (millions)
2,182.6
2,508.0
2,484.6
Net profit (millions)
(61.6)
13.4
(171.5)
Number of Employees
79,025
82,337
96,023
Source:           Trade press, Sanyo Corp annual reports



Company Background

·         Sanyo Electric Co Ltd is an independent company, which maintained a presence in televisions and projectors, camcorders and portable media players subsectors. It is also present in the in-car media and navigation systems among others.
·         Sanyo’s overall strategy is directed towards achieving the goals of its Lifestyle Program and realise its "Think GAIA" vision. It aims to establish a clear global management structure, which will lead to quicker decision making and clarify profit accountability.
·         Sanyo has regional distribution, concentrated in key cities in Japan. In terms of international operations, the company plans to transfer its TV business headquarters to its main market, North America, and form a global management system. Sanyo has been executing the restructuring mainly focused on its TV business. As a part of that, Sanyo decided to close its Tudela factory in Spain held by Sanyo Espana, SA.
·         To further concentrate Sanyo’s strengths in its core businesses, it closed down the manufacturing of regular DVD player (except for portable ones), DVD recorder and VCR businesses by merging Sanyo Echnosound Co Ltd in January 2006 to Sanyo Electric Co Ltd.


Production

·         Sanyo’s production is done outside Japan. In 2005, the company plans to reorganise its overseas production bases and restructure the sales system in Japan, through the identification of unprofitable models, domestic sales reforms and cost structure reforms.
·         Sanyo manufacturers its own brand products to maintain a presence in the Japanese market. In 2005, the company was left with a surplus of products and therefore decided to decrease its range of product models and take measures to improve cost competitiveness.


Competitive Positioning

·         Although Sanyo is one of the active players in the consumer electronics market in Japan, it maintains other interests other areas as well. In 2005, it was engaged in “photonecs” and semi-conductor production.
·         Sanyo has a wide product portfolio but plans to cut non-marketable brands, which may result in a narrowing of its product portfolio focusing only on some brands and concentrating on the most profitable areas of the market.
·         In the course of the company’s restructuring phase, Sanyo positioned itself at the mid-range of the market. In 2005, its overall share of 1.1% of consumer electronics ranked it twentieth among the leaders in the market. This however represented a decrease in overall shares due to tightening market competition brought about by price discounts among major retailers.
·         In terms of innovation, Sanyo merely bandwagons in the consumer electronics market. The launch of the Xacti DMX-HD1 5 mega pixel digital camera was simply a response to the growing demand for higher resolution, and its “Gorilla” car navigation system simply follows the trend for terrestrial broadcasting.
·         As a result of its restructuring, Sanyo is compelled to focus on a more niche positiong. This means the company is finding products and brands more appropriate to the most productive subsectors in order to offset losses experienced in the past. Sanyo derives its share from a strong presence in various subsectors such as televisions and projectors, camcorders and portable media players.
·         At present, the company positions itself in the fastest growth segments such as digital televisions, camcoders, and portable media players, as part of its strategy of maintaining profitable margins. In 2006, Sanyo concluded a basic agreement with Quanta Computer Inc based in Taiwan in order to standardise product platforms.

Subsector
Share
Rank
Televisions and projectors
7.2%
8
TV and VCR/DVD combinations
11.9%
3
Camcorders
4.2%
7
Portable media players
5.4%
7
In-car media players
6.5%
8
Navigation systems
6.5%
7
Other in-car consumer electronics
2.6%
10
Source:           Trade press, Hitachi company reports, Euromonitor International estimates

Preservationists want the city to expand the Madison Square North Historic District

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

Manhattan preservationists are hoping the city will make the Madison Square North Historic District three blocks bigger. Several elected officials, including State Senator Brad Hoylman and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to expand the Madison Square North Historic District in the wake of a failed attempt to landmark the neighborhood’s 116-year-old building at 316 Fifth Avenue, according to Curbed. The district runs from Madison Avenue to Sixth Avenue […]

Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd - Consumer Electronics - Singapore

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help


 Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd - Consumer Electronics - Singapore

Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         Sony, despite the recent success of its popular PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable gaming consoles, BRAVIA range of flat-panel HDTVs, Vaio line of ultra-chic laptops and a host of other iconic consumer electronics, is expected to experience a decline in growth over the short to medium term as it suffers from an overall decline in demand for consumer electronics in a recessionary economic environment. This has been further exacerbated by the recent strengthening of the yen, which has made Sony’s consumer electronics, already considered to be priced at a premium over its competitors, pricier in an ultra-competitive market. However, Sony’s strong brand name, good reputation for product quality and high performance, coupled with its iconic consumer electronics, will insulate Sony to a certain degree from the slow down expected in the consumers electronics market in the forecast period.  
·         Sony plans to retain its position as the leading players in the Singapore’s consumer electronics in the face of intense competition from its Japanese and Korean rivals, the latter of which have been making progress in product quality, market share and brand prestige. Sony’s main strength rests in its ability to create and successfully market iconic market products that stand out from amongst its peer in a class of its own. Sony is expected to further leverage its iconic consumer electronic lines to expand its market share by attracting new and loyal consumers. Classic examples includes the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable gaming consoles, Vaio laptops, the Cybershot digital cameras and HandyCam digital camcorders and its BRAVIA range of flat-panel HDTVs.
·         Sony’s main challenge in the short to medium term mainly rests in dealing with the expected decline for consumer electronics over the next two years as demand falls in tandem with consumers’ confidence level and disposable incomes as they cope with the fallout of a global recession. A stronger yen has worsened the situation by making Sony’s consumer electronics, largely manufactured in and imported from Japan, more expensive than usual in the local market, in a retail environment where consumers from all segments are expected to be more price-conscious. Already, Sony Corp announced a 72% drop in profits for Q308, illustrating the problems facing Sony worldwide. Its South Korean rivals on the other hand have been enjoying a weakening won, which have made them more competitive and with some consumer electronics from leading South Korean brands such as Samsung and LG matching their Japanese counterparts in terms of quality, Sony will face a challenge in convincing new and existing consumers to choose Sony products.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd
Address:
2 International Business Park, #01-10, Tower One, The Strategy, Singapore 609930
Tel:
+(65) 6544 8888
Fax:
+(65) 6544 8469
www:
http://www.sony.com.sg
Activities:
Sales and marketing of all Sony products in the region.
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, Trade press



Company Background

·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd is a fully owned subsidiary of Sony Corp and handles the marketing, sales and service of Sony products in the region.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd is present in the televisions and projectors market, the home audio and cinema market, the cameras market, the camcorders market, the portable media players market, and finally the in-car consumer electronics market. It also has a small but steady presence in the laptops sub-sector of the computers market.
·         Sony’s recent strategy has been to create new and iconic consumer electronics in various market segments to capture consumer loyalty and attention from both the media and market, before leveraging on the increased visibility and brand awareness offered by these iconic products to launch new technology or product lines in the market. For example, Sony’s resounding success in establishing Blu-Ray as the dominant new-generation technology for DVD media and players largely rested in how it made its iconic PlayStation 3 gaming console a fully-featured Blu-Ray DVD player as well, leveraging on its cult status in the gaming console market. Sony’s iconic range of BRAVIA flat-panel HDTVs have also enjoyed resounding success in the local markets and Sony has leveraged on that to substantially expand its flat-panel HDTV offerings across all screen sizes and product segment such as HD-Ready and Full-HD, as well as in marketing its new range of home theatre systems and solutions.
·         There have been no major changes in Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd labour force recently.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd distributes Sony products both locally as well as regionally in the Asia-Pacific region.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd recently introduced Joi Chua, a regionally acclaimed music artist, as Sony’s first Alpha Brand – representing Sony’s premium DSLR cameras – as ambassador in Singapore.
·         Sharp and Sony announced a collaboration early in 2008 to set up a joint company that would produce advanced LCD panels for the next generation of large screen LCD HDTVs, with Sharp to contribute 66% of the capital and Sony the remaining 34%. This is on top of Sony’s currently existing joint venture with Samsung, which resulted in the company S-LCD producing LCD panels in South Korea for both manufacturers.


Production

·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd imports all of its consumer electronic products that it retails from various manufacturing sites and factories worldwide. It does not directly manufacture any of its consumer electronics products in Singapore.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd does not export to other countries.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd does not manufacture products for other brands under license.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd presence in Singapore is to oversee the distribution and marketing of Sony products in the Singapore market; with Sony Electronics Asia Pacific overseeing distribution and marketing of Sony products in the South East Asian, Oceanic, Middle East and Africa regions. 


Competitive Positioning

·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd core business is in the distribution, marketing and support of consumer electronics products. It has a significant presence in multiple sectors within the consumer electronics industry and is a market leader or a leading player in some of these sectors. Sectors in which Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd is present includes televisions and projectors, home audio and cinema, cameras, camcorders, the laptops sub-sector in the computers market and the in-car consumer electronics market.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd markets a wide and diverse range of consumer products including cameras, television sets, camcorders and laptops, which mostly cater to consumers in the middle- to higher-end of the market, although it has recently expanded its product range in the entry-level segment of the market.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd largely positions itself in the medium to high range of the mass consumer market with its products generally being more expensive than its competitors but also being perceived to be of a higher quality and better design.
·         Sony Electronics Singapore Pte Ltd is the market leader in the camcorders market and the in-car consumer electronics market. It is also the number two player in the cameras market and a leading player in the televisions and projectors market and the home audio and cinema market.
·         Sony’s market share in the televisions and projectors market has been declining gradually over the current review period as it faces intense competition from rivals, especially the leading South Korean brands such as Samsung, which offer high quality and more affordable models. However, it has been gaining market share in the home audio and cinema market, the cameras market, the camcorders market and the in-car consumer electronics market.
·         Sony has been a market leader and trend-setter in consumer electronics due to its ability to create and market iconic consumer electronics that capture the hearts and minds of consumers with a combination of next-generation technology, ultra-chic design and innovation. Its PlayStation 3 and PlayStation portable gaming consoles are in a class of their own and its CyberShot digital cameras have long been regarded as a forerunner in the design department.
·         Sony’s strong presence in multiple subsectors and segments across the whole breadth of the consumer electronics market clearly indicates its goal of dominating the consumer electronics market. It is already regarded as the global leader in consumer electronics by many and its Singapore subsidiary is clearly aiming to establish the same status for Sony in local markets.
·         Is wide range of products across the consumer electronics market has put Sony in a unique position of straddling both the mature and emerging segments of the market, capturing the former with its tried-and-tested models, which have gained a positive reputation in terms of quality and value, and being a leading player in the latter segment as it constantly renews previous-generation models with new technology and modern design cues, as well as introducing next-generation models with cutting-edge technology and innovative features.

Product type
Value share
Rank
Televisions and Projectors
15.3%
2
Home Audio and Cinema
17.0%
3
Cameras
17.7%
2
Camcorders
41.8%
1
In-Car Consumer Electronics
29.5%
1
Source:           Euromonitor International


By the numbers: Online or onsite?

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

From the September issue: Nearly a third of consumers from nine countries say they would rather do the dishes than go shopping — at least in an actual store, according to a recent survey by French information technology firm Capgemini. Not surprisingly, that attitude has put a major damper on retail as consumers have increasingly opted for the convenience of ordering everything from diapers to makeup to clothing online. Given that backdrop, the question must be asked: […]

Acadia sells Inwood office building

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

UPDATED: Sep 18., 4:30 pm: Fairbridge Properties bought a 53,000-square-foot office building in Inwood, records filed with the city Tuesday show. Acadia Real Estate Trust sold the property at 4055 10th Avenue for $30.6 million. Fairbridge, a New Jersey-based investment firm, financed its acquisition with a $24.5 million loan from French financial services firm Societe Generale, according to records. The building has sextupled in value since Acadia bought it in 2006, when it paid just […]

AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RAISES $4.1 MILLION IN SANTA BARBARA

by Kayla Kong @ Avon Foundation

More than 1,600 AVON 39ers conquered 39.3-miles to take down breast cancer SANTA BARBARA, September 10, 2017 – AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer continued its 15th annual event series in Santa Barbara this weekend raising $4.1 million to accelerate breast cancer research; improve access to screening, diagnosis and treatment; and educate people […]

The post AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RAISES $4.1 MILLION IN SANTA BARBARA appeared first on Avon Foundation.

Coal Market in UK- Five Forces Analysis of United Kingdom

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Coal Market in UK- Five Forces Analysis of Coal Industry in United Kingdom



The coal market will be analyzed taking coal mining companies as players. The key buyers will be taken as power generation companies, and mining equipment suppliers and landowners/regulators as the key suppliers.

In the 1980’s much of the UK’s coal production was ceased, in favor of cheaper imported coal. Three-quarters of coal consumed within the UK is imported from Russia, South-Africa and Australia. However, unpredictability in the price of foreign sourced coal is causing the UK government to promote an increase in domestic coal production.

Domestic production of coal is dominated by UK Coal and the major buyers are power generation companies. The size and strength of buyers in this market grants them significant leverage and the limited potential for product differentiation for coal suppliers does little to offset this. Backwards integration is rarely viable however and a high level of dependency on such energy sources restrains buyer power which, overall, is assessed as moderate.

Suppliers in the market include mining equipment manufacturers and landowners and land regulators. The specialist nature of the former limits the range of demand for such products; however the strength of suppliers is concentrated more heavily in the hands of those who control access to regional coal reserves. When we incorporate this force, supplier power rises to moderate.

Healthy growth may attract new entrants to the coal market and the aforementioned inability to significantly differentiate coal products leaves current players more vulnerable. Through bulk production they are protected, however, by the advantages of scale economies. The threat of new entrants does not exceed moderate. Low switching costs allows buyers to shift the balance of a primary energy mix however the costs of wholesale shifts are greater.

Whilst other sources of energy hold certain benefits they remain problematic in other areas and the surge in demand for energy reinforces the role of coal. The threat from substitutes is only moderate. The size and similarity of major players in the market and the difficulty of market exit sustains competition yet it is constrained by healthy growth and a degree of geographical diversification. Rivalry is moderate.

 Buyer Power


Buyers in this market are generally power generation companies. In the UK market buyers include both power companies that are exclusively involved in upstream activities such as power generation and more vertically integrated entities such as RWE Group, which both generates and supplies electricity to end users through its service provider Npower. Buyers can also be industrial and retail users. Coal companies are therefore not just selling to one or two dominant buyers, which decreases the power of buyers here. Steel companies are also buyers with coking coal used in the manufacture of steel. They are often large and highly diversified which increases buyer power.

Backward integration by buyers is also likely here as steel companies often are involved in the mining of coal too, for example BHP Billiton. Coal is an undifferentiated commodity and competition within the market is therefore largely driven by price. However, coal is a vitally important product to buyers in this market and as a result buyers are highly reliant on market players. Overall buyer power in this market is moderate.

Supplier Power

Key suppliers in this market include producers of mining and production equipment. In general, supplier power is weakened by the fact that the metals and mining market is important to supplier revenues, as mining equipment is highly specialized. Backward integration is unlikely as market players and buyers operate in distinctly different industries. Innovation in the technology and equipment for mining allows suppliers to differentiate their services and establish some loyalty with market players. Overall supplier power is moderate.

 New Entrants

A sharp increase in the internationally traded price of coal in recent years has increased the viability of domestic coal production, triggering mine re-openings and the opening of new mines within the country, increasing the potential for new entrants. However, Capital outlay in coal mining is extremely high with investment needed in expensive equipment, specialized techniques and the initial purchase of mines.

Costs in this market are high, the main outgoings being transportation and energy which have both faced increased prices in recent years. This increase in expense makes new companies less likely to enter. Stringent environmental regulations are increasingly putting pressure on the production of coal and it is becoming increasingly expensive for companies to comply with such regulations.

Coal is said to be the most environmentally damaging fossil fuel. The European Commission has introduced an Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) restricting the amount of emissions that are allowed to be produced. However coal conversion technologies such as coal-to-liquids and coal-to-gas are expected to create new markets for coal supplies which could encourage new entrants. Overall the threat of new entrants is moderate.

Substitutes

Coal has several substitutes in the power generation market: oil, gas, nuclear fuels, etc. These can be seen as quite a strong threat with the current emphasis on utilizing more environmentally friendly fuels. Other substitutes include wind power and solar power which again are more beneficial for the environment but would involve high investment for traditional power generation companies aiming to make the transition to these substitutes.
However, the implementation of clean coal technology (CCT) strategies, such as carbon capture and storage (CCS), within coal fired power stations, may decrease the environmental impact of using coal and reduce the threat of more environmentally friendly substitutes moving forward. The threat of substitutes overall is viewed as moderate.

Rivalry

Domestic coal production is dominated by UK Coal. Increasing demand for domestically mined coal is increasing the domestic market, thus reducing rivalry between existing players. High fixed costs and the prevalence of physical assets in this market mean that exit barriers are high, increasing rivalry in the market. Overall rivalry in this market is moderate.

Market Analysis

The UK coal market has shown fluctuations in its growth rate over the past few years, although it has shown a healthy growth rate in 2008, it will continue to fluctuate over the forecast period.

The UK coal market generated total revenues of $5.4 billion in 2008, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.2% for the period spanning 2004-2008.  In comparison, the French and German markets grew with CAGRs of 7.2% and 8.9%, respectively, over the same period, to reach respective values of $2.4 billion and $26.4 billion in 2008.

Market consumption volumes decreased with a compound annual rate of change (CARC) of -0.3% between 2004-2008, to reach a total of 66.1 million short tons in 2008. The market's volume is expected to rise to 69.1 billion short tons by the end of 2013, representing a CAGR of 0.9% for the 2008-2013 period.

The power generation segment proved the most lucrative for the UK coal market in 2008, generating total revenues of $5,262.4 million, equivalent to 96.8% of the market's overall value. In comparison, the industrial steam segment generated revenues of $173.5 million in 2008, equating to 3.2% of the market's aggregate revenues.

The performance of the market is forecast to decelerate, with an anticipated CAGR of 3.6% for the five-year period 2008-2013, which is expected to drive the market to a value of $6.5 billion by the end of 2013. Comparatively, the French and German markets will grow with CAGRs of 1.1% and 3.2%, respectively, over the same period, to reach respective values of $2.5 billion and $31 billion in 2013.

Need a new roof? State agencies suspend certain rules to hasten post-Irma recovery

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

From TRD Miami: Gov. Rick Scott ordered state agencies to suspend certain construction permit requirements and other regulations to quicken repairs at property damaged last week by Hurricane Irma. The Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation issued an emergency order to “suspend certain regulations and fees that may prevent, hinder or delay” recovery from Irma, including roof repairs and installations. “I think that’s a great move. It has been done in the past” after […]

Breast Cancer Prevention: A Focus on Air Pollution

by AvonFoundation @ Avon Foundation

BY ALEXANDRA GOHO Every day, women come into contact with hundreds of potentially hazardous chemicals where they live and work, whether it’s from consumer products or contaminants in the environment. Many of these chemicals have been linked with breast cancer. However, which ones pose the greatest risk and how can we reduce our exposures? These […]

The post Breast Cancer Prevention: A Focus on Air Pollution appeared first on Avon Foundation.

The Power of 39 – AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer Takes Over the Windy City and Beantown

by AvonFoundation @ Avon Foundation

AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer recently walked through Chicago and Boston, making a big, pink statement! As our third and fourth walks of the season, 39ers were out in full force and were ready to take on the 2-day, 39.3 mile challenge with fierceness and passion. Whether they were a long-time alumni […]

The post The Power of 39 – AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer Takes Over the Windy City and Beantown appeared first on Avon Foundation.

Avon goes native - DoubleClick

Avon goes native - DoubleClick


DoubleClick by Google

Avon Brazil went beyond standard display banners to connect with their mobile-first audience in a less disruptive way, enabling them to promote their products within relevant content. Learn more.

5 Essential Steps for Women Starting Endurance Racing

by Sarah Dukler @ Kathrine Switzer – Marathon Woman

Ana Dutra could barely swim across a pool when a friend suggested they sign up for a triathlon. “I had not swam since I was a child,” she says, “but I decided to train anyway.” Her first event consisted of

The post 5 Essential Steps for Women Starting Endurance Racing appeared first on Kathrine Switzer - Marathon Woman.

Big gains predicted for HK house prices

by The Real Deal Staff @ The Real Deal New York

Price increases to occur by end of 2017 according to new report

SEC Investigates Bogus Bid For Avon

SEC Investigates Bogus Bid For Avon


NPR.org

The Securities and Exchange Commission received notice from a company calling itself PTG Capital that it intended to buy the cosmetics retailer. The only problem: no such company exists.

Motorola Industrial LTDA - Consumer Electronics - Brazil

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help



Motorola Industrial LTDA - Consumer Electronics - Brazil

Motorola Industrial Ltda



Strategic Direction

·         Motorola wants to be seen as having the most innovative products in the mobile phone subsector. The company already sponsors fashion events and others events targeting young consumers.
·         Although there are many very simple mobiles available from different companies, making mobile communication almost a commodity, Motorola is looking to the public that will in the near future, consume mobile phone like clothes, changing every season to the most updated style.
·         Investing in technology and having a very innovative image in Brazil, Motorola has everything in place to achieve its goals. The brand received the Top of Mind Prize 2005 as the most recognised mobile phone brand in Brazil.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Motorola Industrial Ltda
Address:
Rodovia SP 340 s/no. Km 128.7m - Jaguariuna – SP – CEP 13820-000
Tel:
+55 11 3328 3838
WWW:
www.motorola.com.br
Activities:
Mobile phone manufacturer
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, trade press



2003
2004
2005
Net sales (US$ million)
800
1,000
1,300
Number of Employees
-
-
6,500
Source:           Trade press, company research



Company Background

·         Since 1995, US$500 million was invested in its Brazilian base, a great part of this in the Campus Industrial e Tecnológico de Jaguariúna (SP), home to its industrial plant and where research is undertaken by an engineering team of 30 people.
·         Its Brazilian production services the needs of the entire Latin American region.
·         Motorola is a global leader in telecommunications. In Brazil, it achieved sales of US$1.3 billion in 2005, up 30% on the previous year.
·         Brazil is among the four focus-countries of the company, together with Russia, India and China.
·         In Brazil, Motorola is also present in the sale of internet access, cable modems, automotive systems and telematic solutions among others.
·         Motorola Brazilbis also socially responsible, and this brought the company the recognition of the US Government. Motorola Brazil received the prize for Corporate Excellence for the company’s actions in the social area in Brazil: educational, social, cultural and environment. An example is that in five years, one of its projects recycled 100 tons of batteries in Brazil.


Production

·         Motorola supplies the internal market with products produced in Brazil. Motorola’s industrial complex in Brazil is also an export centre. It has exported phone to the value of US$4 billion since it began operations in 1997, making Motorola a major exporter in Brazil. Motorola uses Brazil as its export base for the Latin American region.


Competitive Positioning

·         Besides marketing investments to fight against Nokia leadership in the high-end segment, Motorola also invests in technological research. In Jaguariúna, interior of São Paulo, a group of 160 engineers are part of the company’s world elite in mobile phone development.
·         Motorola products aim at the high-end market. Its portfolio of products is the biggest and most varied in the subsector.
·         The success of the company in Brazil is linked to hit products like the StarTac in 2001 and the RZR in 2005. After StarTac, Motorola lost market share because of the advance of GSM technology in Brazil (the company was deeper into CDMA), and also because of rapid new releases by its competitors.
·         In 2005, Motorola again gained share due to the huge success of new models, especially the RZR. This mobile phone comes in many different colours, even gold, the Dolce & Gabanna version, that was released during São Paulo Fashion Week in Brazil.
·         In 2005, Motorola ranked second in mobile phone sales in Brazil, with a 26% market share. The success of the ‘Hello Moto’ campaign also contributed to the success of the company in recent years. This positioned Motorola as a young, creative and high-end company.
·         Innovation is also present in Motorola’s partnerships. In 2006, in association to the operator Vivo, the company is starting to spread the concept of the hybrid-phone, working as a regular phone at home and a mobile outside.

Subsector
Share
Rank
Mobile phones
26%
2
Source:           Trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates


Dropping soon: The Real Deal’s fall issue!

by Jhila Farzaneh @ The Real Deal New York

The Real Deal Los Angeles‘ fall magazine is set to hit newsstands this October! The upcoming issue is packed with the most important industry news and insider information, including a look inside the world of residential broker coaching and foreign investment in L.A. real estate. The October magazine will also look at the top commercial brokerages doing business in the San Fernando Valley, as well the city’s industrial boom — currently the most in-demand sector […]

Congresswoman’s daughter in spat with neighbors over three-year townhouse renovation

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

The people who live close to Dana Lowey Luttway’s Upper West Side townhouse claim her years-long renovation is destroying their quality of life. Luttway — the daughter of Congress member Nita Lowey — paid $10 million for the home in 2014, DNAinfo reported. While she has renovated and flipped townhouses in the past, Luttway told the publication she intends to live there with her family. Locals say they’ve been complaining about dust and noise since […]

Council member planning a bill that would incentivize “affordable retail”

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

Affordable housing has been one of the most dominant topics in New York City over the past few years, and one City Council member now wants the conversation to include affordable retail as well. Council member Robert Cornegy, who represents Bedford-Stuyvesant and Crown Heights, told The Real Deal he plans to introduce legislation by the end of the year that would offer developers incentives like tax breaks and additional development rights if they agree to […]

Everything You Need to Know About Avon Collectibles

Everything You Need to Know About Avon Collectibles


ThoughtCo

One of the more popular collectible searches continues to be Avon collectibles. Here are some links that will help you in your search to learn more.

Sharp Electronics (UK) Ltd - Consumer Electronics - United Kingdom

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Sharp Electronics (UK) Ltd - Consumer Electronics - United Kingdom


Sharp Electronics (uk) Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         Sharp Corporation aims to be at the frontline of the high-end consumer electronics market. The company invests a great deal on research and development in order to continue to launch innovative products.
·         Having a wide portfolio of products, including electronic components and computer hardware and peripherals, Sharp anticipates it will enjoy some level of protection against the risk of over-exposure in a particular business segment.
·         The increase in the number of products manufactured in low-cost countries in East Asia, primarily in China and South Korea, will put the company under strong pressure and it will face severe threats in most of its business sectors.
·         The growth of the LCD TV industry, together with the growth of the mobile phone market in Asia, are likely to contribute to the company’s future sales performance, as it finds itself well-positioned in these sectors.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Sharp Electronics UK Ltd
Address:
4 Furzeground Way, Stockley Park, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB11 1EZ
Tel:
+44 (0)208 734 2000
Fax:
+44 (0)208 734 2400
www:
www.sharp.co.uk
Activities:
Manufacturer of electronic components and computer hardware and peripherals.
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, Trade press



2004
2005
Net sales (GP£ million)
374.1
354.6
Net profit (GP£ million)
2.8
9.5
Number of employees (company-wide)
n/a
56,800*
Source:           Trade press, Company research
Note:               *Worldwide



Company Background

·         Sharp dedicates all of its resources to the development and manufacture of electronic equipment. It can claim one of the widest ranges of business and lifestyle products under a single brand name in the world.
·         In 1912 Sharp's founder, Tokuji Hayakawa, was awarded a patent for the "Tokubijo" snap buckle and, in the same year, he established a small metalworking shop in Tokyo. The company was incorporated as Hayakawa Metal Works Institute Co in 1935 and it changed its name to Sharp Corporation in 1970. The first overseas expansion took place in 1962 with the creation of Sharp Electronics in the US.
·         In 2001, Sharp established Sharp Telecommunications of Europe, a subsidiary aimed at developing mobile phones. Sharp now has 58 subsidiaries and maintains operations in 25 countries spanning North America, Europe, Asia, and Oceania.
·         In 2004 Sharp, together with D&Amp, M Holdings, Kenwood, Onkyo, Pioneer, Sony, JVC, and Yamaha, established Any Music, a joint venture created to distribute music services. In the same year, Sharp began producing photovoltaic modules from its manufacturing base located in Wrexham, North Wales.
·         In 2006, Sharp reported net sales of £11,249 million. Japan is the largest geographical market for the company, accounting for almost 60% of total sales. The Americas follow with 11.4% of sales, followed by China with 11.2% and Europe with 10.6%.
·         Sharp won the 2007 “What Home Cinema LCD Awards” for its LC-42XD1E 42-inch LCD TV that increases contrast ratio and detail and reduces image lag. The company also won the “What Satellite and Digital TV” award for its LC-42XD1E, a large LCD screen that works as well with standard definition digital material as it does with high definition action. Sharp has also introduced a Blu-ray disc recorder with 1-TB hard drive.
·         Sharp signed an agreement in 2007 with Fujitsu, Mitshubishi, NTT DoCoMo, Renesas Technology and Sony Ericsson to develop the functionality of the third-generation mobile phones.
·         In 2007, Sharp successfully developed a 108V-inch LCD TV, the world’s largest. In the same year, the company launched the High-Power Blue-Violet Laser Diode GH04P21A2G, a device that allows high-speed recording on dual-layer Blu-ray discs.
·         In 2007, the company announced an agreement to acquire 14% of the capital of Pioneer, its objective being to enter the DVD player and navigation system subsectors.


Production

·         Sharp manufactures and distributes all of its consumer electronic products, including televisions, CD and DVD players, video cameras, mobile phones, desktops and printers. It operates from 64 bases in 30 countries and its products are distributed to 164 countries worldwide.
·         Sharp’s production activities are organized into two main areas: 1) consumer and information products, which includes audio-visual and communication equipment, information equipment and home appliances and 2) electronic components, which includes integrated circuits, LCDs and other electronic components.


Competitive Positioning

·         In 2006, Sharp ranked eighth in the UK’s TV and projectors subsector with a volume share of 7.8%. In TV and VCR/DVD combinations subsector, the company held a volume share of 2.6%. Sharp is benefiting as the LCD industry booms and as consumers switch from traditional cathode-ray TV formats to digital formats.
·         In the mobile phone sector, Sharp ranked ninth in 2006 with a volume share of 0.6%. Prospects are nevertheless very optimistic due to the anticipated expansion of the mobile phone market in the Asia Pacific region.
·         Sharp’s desktop business segment has not performed well due to the strong competition of the market and to the more expensive products that it sells.
·         One of the company’s major weaknesses is its dependence on the Japanese market, which accounts for almost 60% of the company’s total sales.
·         The high level of competition in the marketplace and the increasing availability of cheaper products from East Asian countries are likely to pose challenges to Sharp’s future sales performance.

Product type
Volume share %
Rank
Televisions and projectors
7.8
8
TV and VCR/DVD combinations
2.6
5
Mobile phones
0.6
9
Source:           Euromonitor International


It’s official: Amazon is coming to Brookfield’s 5 Manhattan West

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

The Far West Side has already drawn some of the world’s biggest financial and law firms. And now, it’s landed perhaps the biggest prize of them all: Amazon. The e-commerce giant announced Thursday that it has signed a 360,000-square-foot, 15-year lease at Brookfield Property Partners’ 5 Manhattan West. It will serve as New York’s main location for Amazon Advertising, and jobs at the site will include software engineers, data analysts and economists. Amazon will take […]

Acer UK Ltd - Consumer Electronics - United Kingdom

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help





Acer UK Ltd - Consumer Electronics - United Kingdom

Acer UK Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         Acer is aiming to grow its notebook sales to become the leading global manufacturer in that market and consolidate that position.
·         As of late 2008, Acer was on course to achieve this target, having passed Hewlett-Packard to become the global market leader in notebook sales. In the UK, however, its position is still slightly weaker than in the rest of Europe and the company will be looking to improve it by adopting a more coherent marketing strategy and developing its products with the strongest reputations.
·         Acer faces extremely tough competition from the other two computer giants, Hewlett-Packard and Dell, who lead Acer in the overall rankings in the global and UK computer markets. Sales in the UK have dipped slightly as Acer does not have the brand recognition of Hewlett-Packard or Dell, although it is still evidently a major player.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Acer UK Ltd
Address:
Acer House, Heathrow Boulevard III, 282 Bath Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 0DQ
Tel:
(+44) 870 853 1000
Fax:
(+44) 870 853 1004
www:
www.acer.co.uk
Activities:
Computer manufacturing
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, trade press



2007
Net sales (£ million)
7,114.2
Net profit (£ million)
199.5
Number of employees
5,400
Source:           Trade press, company research



Company Background

·         Acer UK Ltd is the UK arm of Acer Incorporated, a public company registered in Taiwan.
·         The company was founded in 1976 under the name Multitech, and it originally sold electronic components and acted as a consultant on microprocessor technologies.
·         In 1987 the company expanded to 11 employees and changed its name to Acer before beginning to manufacture computers. It later acquired Texas Instruments in 1997.
·         Acer maintains a global presence with market leadership in 13 European countries and in India. In other markets, such as Australia, the US and the UK, it is in third place overall.
·         Acer’s recent strategy has been to focus on marketing methods that best utilise its distribution channels, This has manifested itself in such strategies as the collaboration with Ferrari’s Formula 1 team to make a laptop that features the Ferrari logo prominently on its case
·         The company is continuing to contract its workforce in order to maximise margins.
·         Acer has a national distribution network.


Production

·         Acer supplies the UK market from abroad, importing most of its goods as it has outsourced most production to its own manufacturing arm, Wistron Corporation. Wistron has a manufacturing centre in Brno, Czech Republic, which supplies most of the European market for Acer.
·         Wistron has offices and manufacturing centres throughout the world, which supply Acer’s extensive market including all of Asia, Europe, Australasia and North America. Wistron is one of the top 20 manufacturing companies in Taiwan.


Competitive Positioning

·         Acer is purely a computer manufacturer, which perhaps has more of a reputation for laptops in the UK, but it also has a strong record in desktops. As with many leading computer companies, this is not regarded as a narrow portfolio despite the concentration on the computing sector to the exclusion of all other products. This obviously reflects the particularly complex and competitive nature of computer design.
·         Acer maintains its position across all market segments, but for the most part, like its competitors Dell and Hewlett-Packard, its products are aimed at the middle market. It is difficult to sustain leadership of any type in the computers sector without a strong presence in the middle and low end of the market, since computers are generally one of the more expensive products in consumer electronics.
·         The company’s market share in consumer electronics as a whole was 0.16% in 2007, which put it in forty-fourth position the overall list. In computers, however, Acer was in tenth place overall and in laptops it held sixth place with a market share of 5.75%. This is a disappointing performance by Acer’s global standards, and that is why the company is focusing particularly on strengthening its position in the UK as its weakest-performing European market.
·         Acer’s market share has in general been stagnant, but it will be worried by its slight loss of share in its flagship notebook market, from 5.80% in 2006 to 5.75% in 2007.
·         Although the company is an innovative designer in its own right, it has also been accused of copying other companies’ patents and designs in the past, which slightly dented its market standing.
·         As a laptops specialist, Acer will certainly hope to benefit from the forecast good health of that subsector. Laptops are forecast to overtake desktops as the more popular computer purchase in 2009 and already constituted 48.9% of the market by volume in 2008. With this trend forecast to continue, Acer will no doubt see an opportunity to increase its market share while its other competitors will tend to divide their energies more between desktops and laptops.

Product type
Volume share (%)
Rank
Computers
2.64
10
Laptops
5.75
6
Source:           Euromonitor International


Another fatal construction accident at Brookfield’s 1 Manhattan West

by Miriam @ The Real Deal New York

An electrical contractor fell to his death at 1 Manhattan West Thursday afternoon, the second such fatality at the Brookfield Property Partners’ development since June. A 45-year-old worker who was employed by a Queens-based contractor fell out of a bucket lift on the third floor of the project and died. Another man, also 45, fell from the bucket as well, and was rushed to hospital, according to Gothamist. He is reported to be in stable […]

AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RETURNS TO SANTA BARBARA SEPTEMBER 9-10

by Kayla Kong @ Avon Foundation

SANTA BARBARA, July 21, 2017 – AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer kicks off its sixth event of its 15th season in Santa Barbara September 9-10 with a steadfast commitment to help power more breast cancer research, more screenings and more survivors. The participants all have a fierce resolve to do something big […]

The post AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RETURNS TO SANTA BARBARA SEPTEMBER 9-10 appeared first on Avon Foundation.

AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RAISES $2.9 MILLION IN BOSTON

by Kayla Kong @ Avon Foundation

 More than 1,275 AVON 39ers conquered 39.3-miles to take down breast cancer   BOSTON, June 25, 2017 – AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer continued its 15th annual event series in Boston this weekend raising $2.9 million to accelerate breast cancer research; improve access to screening, diagnosis and treatment; and educate people about […]

The post AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RAISES $2.9 MILLION IN BOSTON appeared first on Avon Foundation.

The Real Deal’s fourth annual South Florida showcase is ON for Oct. 26!

by Jhila Farzaneh @ The Real Deal New York

From TRD Miami: Hurricane Irma my have left Miami battered and bruised, but South Floridians are a resilient bunch who are coming back stronger than ever. That being said, The Real Deal’s South Real Estate Showcase and Forum at Soho Studios will go on as scheduled on Oct. 26! In the aftermath of the storm, we’ve included another panel that will examine Irma and the effects of storm surge on South Florida real estate. Last […]

City Planning signs off on rezoning of Rabsky’s Pfizer sites

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

The City Planning Commission on Tuesday signed off on rezoning a group of Brooklyn properties — known as the Pfizer sites — owned by the Rabsky Group, moving the developer one step closer to building a 1 million-square-foot housing complex. Harrison Realty, an affiliate of Simon Dushinsky and Isaac Rabinowitz’s Rabsky, plans to build 1,146 residential units across eight buildings on the Williamsburg sites as part of the city’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing program. The developer […]

Avon to cut 2,500 jobs, move headquarters from NYC to UK

Avon to cut 2,500 jobs, move headquarters from NYC to UK


New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

NEW YORK — Avon Products Inc. says it is cutting 2,500 jobs and moving its headquarters from New York to Great Britain.The move comes after the cosmetics giant sold its North American business to private-equity firm Cerberus.Avon had 28,300 employees outside its sold-off North American operations at the end of December. It said Monday it will book a $60 million charge in the current quarter due to the layoffs.

AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RETURNS TO SAN FRANCISCO JULY 8-9

by Nancy Delgado @ Avon Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO, June 13, 2017 – AVON 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer kicks off its fifth event of its 15th season in San Francisco July 8-9 with a steadfast commitment to help power more breast cancer research, more screenings and more survivors. The participants all have a fierce resolve to do something big […]

The post AVON 39 THE WALK TO END BREAST CANCER RETURNS TO SAN FRANCISCO JULY 8-9 appeared first on Avon Foundation.

Short-term interest rates might rise again, Fed officials signal in contrast to Yellen

by The Real Deal Staff @ The Real Deal New York

Three officials indicated openness to increasing rates before year end

Travel Retail in the United Arab Emirates

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Travel Retail in the United Arab Emirates-Dissertation Writing Help



Headlines

·         There are 816 travel retail outlets across the UAE, with 28 new outlets opening in 2007, an increase of 4% compared to 2006
·         Total revenues for all travel retail amounted to AED15,611 million in 2007, an increase of 13% compared to 2006, with the greatest revenue generator remaining flight-only packages, which account for 60% of all revenues in the sector
·         One key factor affecting inbound travel agencies in 2007 was a shortage of rooms in the UAE which made it difficult for them to attract visitors
·         Competitive activity is nevertheless significant, with DNATA engaging in ongoing promotional offers and on-line developments, while Emirates Holidays has started offering packages for new destinations in line with Emirates Airlines' route expansions
·         With a booming tourism sector, travel agencies will continue mushrooming in the UAE, with the number predicted to reach 492 in 2012, out of a total of 987 travel retail outlets across the UAE


Trends

·         Among the 816 travel retail outlets operating across the UAE, 145 are exchange services, 266 are tour operators and 434 are fully fledged travel agencies.
·         Total revenues for all travel retail amounted to AED15,611 million in 2007, an increase of 13% compared to 2006, with the greatest revenue generator being flight-only packages, which account for 60% of all revenues in the sector. Flight-only was also the fastest growing subsector in 2007, with growth of 17%, followed by city breaks, with 13%, and adventure holidays, with 11%. Flight-only packages are increasingly important as consumers have gained access to diverse sources of information – notably the Internet – which is making it easier to book trips by combining offers from different suppliers. City breaks and adventure holidays are gaining in importance due to the growing opportunities for this kind of travel which are being offered both inside the UAE and in neighbouring countries.
·         Agents have reported being affected by slashed airline commissions, increasing Internet penetration, shortages of trained personnel and a lack of available rooms in the UAE. Increased Internet penetration is a reason for strong growth in flight-only packages, as travellers are more sophisticated and are increasingly capable of organising their trips in the most cost efficient way, seeking accommodation from local providers at their chosen destination and identifying helpful sources of information on-line.
·         The largest concern in attracting visitors to the UAE in 2007 was a shortage of rooms, which caused travel agents not to deliver on their marketing and promotional promises in many instances. This was especially true for Abu Dhabi where the availability of new rooms is not expected before another two years. Agencies have repeatedly been unable to offer customers what they were asking for because of the shortage. DNATA, the UAE's largest travel agency, complained about the shortage and reported significant missed opportunities because of it. Many agencies have resorted to promoting other destinations than the UAE across the Middle East region. In Dubai, though, a large number of rooms are expected to be ready at the beginning of 2008.
·         A key factor affecting the travel retail sector is the development of on-line purchasing, which is proving challenging for travel agencies, although if capitalised on appropriately it could become a growth factor. Many agencies are starting to recognise that incorporating on-line trading in their operations is the best way forward. Most of the new travel operators are therefore developing comprehensive websites and are seeking to offer on-line booking, in order to attract travellers who are increasingly turning to the Internet. However, growth is hampered by the fact that quick and easy access to the Internet remains an issue for some, despite the growth of Internet penetration, whilst security concerns with revealing credit card details on the Internet are common amongst residents in the UAE. Nevertheless, given the rapid rate at which on-line booking is growing in Europe and the US, it is likely to catch on quickly in the Middle East and specifically in the UAE, potentially causing agencies to lose more customers.
·         In 2007, only 3% of total bookings were made on-line, although on-line sales rose by 25% compared to 2006, with 2008 predicted to experience similar growth. The CAGR between 2007 and 2012 is expected to be 30%, with on-line bookings accounting for 5% of total sales in 2012.
·         Face-to-face interaction with travel agents remains important to Middle East travellers, as Arab culture emphasises building relationships of trust with people, businesses and suppliers through direct contact. This necessitates attending exhibitions such as the Arabian Travel Market and ACTB, (Austrian and Central European Travel Business) during which travel agencies and tourism boards have the opportunity to widen their networks and meet suppliers and business partners, as well as travellers and potential tourists. It also requires agencies to maintain a strong focus on both personal and on-line customer interaction.


Growth Sectors

·         Adventure tourism is attracting an increasing number of UAE travellers, driven by the rising number of destinations for this type of tourism in the UAE and in neighbouring countries. The UAE itself has much to offer adventurers and residents of the UAE wishing to take a short break at a close by destination, without having to spend too much money. Emerging adventure destinations in the UAE include Um Al Quwain, one of the smallest emirates. Um Al Quwain is home to the Aeroclub, a skydiving centre teaching accelerated free fall and tandem skydiving. It also offers helicopter flights and aerial photography activities.
·         The Ras Al Khaimah-based agency Mountain Extreme is an eco-tourism and adventure tourism provider which offers, for instance, a two-day trip to the Majlis Al Jinn, which is one of the largest caves in the world, some 340m long and 228m wide, with a height of 120m. Mountain Extreme operates mostly as an inbound tour operator offering adventure and eco-tourism, although the agency also offers tours to Oman, which is a growing destination for adventure tourism. The agency reported growth in revenues of 78% in 2007, indicating the growing importance of this subsector, especially in light of the increasing number of Europeans and other expatriates in the country, and the increasing number of budget travellers who are generally more inclined to look for adventure and eco-tourism.
·         Following the emergence of artificial ski slopes in Dubai, the outbound market for ski trips has experienced growth. Many agencies, such as Al-Futtaim and Emirates Holidays, offer ski packages to traditional destinations, such as Lebanon and France. Ski Dubai, the company behind the development of Dubai's first artificial ski slope, also promoted luxury ski trips in 2007. The company teamed up with SWISS, the Swiss airline and Première Neige, a leading specialist in luxury ski holidays and an exclusive chalet operator in the French Alpine village resort of Sainte Foy to create a special offer for UAE-based winter sports enthusiasts. Each adult buying a Ski Dubai session pass received a voucher that went into a draw with a first prize of a one-week holiday for four people in Sainte Foy, including flights, transfers, accommodation, ski passes and equipment hire.
·         Cruise packages experienced 7% growth in 2007, driven by the increasing number of cruise ships and packages such as Silversea, which added 14 dedicated segments for the Middle East market. It offers 10-day round trips from Dubai, visiting Muscat, Fujairah, Khasab, Kish Island, Al Manamah and Abu Dhabi. Silversea Cruises also offers "Arabian Nights", a selection of cruises within the UAE and surrounding areas. The cruise industry is generally one of the fastest growing sectors of the travel industry worldwide, with strong growth in the luxury end of the market, which is likely to be reflected in the UAE too.
·         Pilgrimages and religious tourism are also common for Muslim nationals and Muslim expatriates living in the UAE, with the annual pilgrimage to Mecca being the most prominent event of the year.


Competitive Landscape

·         DNATA remains the UAE's strongest and most dynamic travel agency, offering inbound and outbound travel packages. DNATA held 8% of sector value in 2007, down slightly from 2006. This decline was due to increasing competition in the market, with a growing number of smaller agencies which can cater to the basic needs of consumers who may only be looking for flight packages. DNATA also suffered from the shortage of rooms during 2007, which caused the agency not to be able to meet its customers' expectations. Nevertheless, DNATA remains the largest and most active group, with relentless promotional and marketing efforts throughout the year. For instance, during 2007, DNATA inaugurated its groundbreaking airport transfer service, made available exclusively to its customers and operating every day of the week, year-round. Passengers can request the service at the time of purchasing their ticket. The DNATA Travel outlet in Al Quoz was the first outlet to offer this service to the airport and has a designated drop-off point. Also during 2007, DNATA Travel was appointed General Sales Agent for passenger sales for Kingfisher Airlines for Abu Dhabi, Sharjah, the Northern Emirates and Kuwait.
·         DNATA has continued image building efforts through its presence at a number of trade shows, such as the Business Travel Show. DNATA has also chosen to combat the issue of increasing Internet penetration and bookings by focusing on the wholesale and retail business in key areas where the agency enjoys a clear advantage, such as in high-end leisure travel, which requires more personalised service. The agency has also enhanced its call centre services and consolidated its product offering for corporate clients. Nevertheless, while DNATA still believes in the importance of personalised service and direct interaction with customers, the agency is fully aware of the importance of an on-line presence and thus it launched its corporate travel management solution in 2007, a new type of on-line booking system providing unique tracking and reporting tools for travel policies. Further on-line developments should follow in the near future.
·         Maintaining its position as number two travel agency is Emirates Airlines' leisure branch, Emirates Holidays, which accounted for just under 8% of total value sales in 2007. With a strong dependence on Emirates Airlines, and acting in line with the airline's growth strategy, Emirates Holidays is constantly developing new products and packages for new destinations according to the airline's new developments. Following the launch of Emirates' new route to Canada, the agency introduced tailor-made vacations to Canada, offering the choice of seven hotels in Toronto, with excursions to Niagara Falls, or a tour of the East Coast, including Montreal, Quebec, Ottawa and Niagara Falls, or to the West Coast, including Calgary, the National Parks of Banff and Jasper, Sun Picks, Whistler, Victoria and Vancouver. Ski trips in Canada are also offered on separate packages.


Prospects

·         With a booming tourism sector, the travel agencies subsector will continue to grow in the UAE. The number of agencies is predicted to reach 492 in 2012, from a total of 987 travel retail outlets across the UAE. Revenues in the travel retail sector are predicted to grow at a CAGR of 14% between 2007 and 2012, to amount to AED30,539 million at constant 2007 prices. Flight-only packages will remain the fastest growing subsector, with a CAGR of 17%, followed by city breaks, with a 14% CAGR, and adventure tourism, with an 11% CAGR.
·         Although a growing number of young singles are moving to Dubai for work, travel agents have yet to start targeting singles with customised packages, focusing instead only on family vacations. Although UAE nationals usually prefer travelling with their families, this is not the case for single expatriates living in the UAE. The Dubai's expatriates website www.expatriates.com often posts advertisements for holidays with prices included for one. This could be a substantial market for travel agencies as they start identifying the growing demand from young single expatriates.
·         A notable development in the UAE is the establishment of a space tourism hub, with the official appointment of Dubai-based travel agency Sharaf Travel as Virgin Galactic's "accredited space office" for the Middle East region. The agency will offer commercial space flights to consumers in the Middle East at a cost of US$200,000 per ticket. The first flights are likely to be launched in 2009, with just one flight a week at the beginning. Virgin Galactic sees enormous potential in the Middle East region for this kind of travel, especially in the UAE, as Dubai is increasingly positioned as an "eccentric" destination, where everything is possible, even space travel. The question remains, however, whether space travel is indeed going to be the next big thing in the UAE's travel market.


Sector Data



outlets
                                                                       2002               2003               2004               2005               2006               2007

- Exchange services                                       94                 100                 110                 120                 128                 136
- Tour operators                                            216                 225                 235                 247                 250                 258
- Travel agents                                              338                 354                 367                 389                 410                 422
Travel retail outlets                                       648                 679                 712                 756                 788                 816
Source:           Euromonitor International
Note:               Dedicated currency exchange outlets only



AED million
                                                                       2002               2003               2004               2005               2006               2007

- Accommodation only                             582.0              651.0              701.3              742.3              801.0              865.1
- Adventure/trekking                                 307.1              352.9              348.9              375.9              412.0              455.3
    holiday                                                                                                                                                                                      
- City break                                                 502.0              566.1              601.5              679.7              768.8              871.0
- Cruise                                                       200.2              231.5              247.5              263.0              280.1              298.8
- Spa packages                                         168.6              184.5              203.4              217.5              225.2              233.7
- Flight only                                             5,659.5          6,023.4          6,325.0          6,972.7          8,034.7          9,416.7
- Other transport                                        113.1              124.8              137.1              144.0              159.1              168.0
- Fly-drive                                                    542.5              566.0              593.9              652.9              719.5              757.6
- Package holiday                                     973.9          1,062.2          1,164.4          1,221.9          1,294.0          1,374.2
- Travel insurance                                     286.5              306.9              329.4              361.1              397.3              437.8
- Foreign currency                                     318.7              339.0              360.7              387.1              420.0              454.5
- Traveller’s cheques                                  98.5              104.6              111.1              118.2              126.8              135.9
- Other travel retail                                       96.9              105.9              116.2              123.2              132.4              142.1
    products                                                                                                                                                                                   
Travel retail products                            9,849.5        10,618.7        11,240.4        12,259.5        13,770.7        15,610.7
Source:           Euromonitor International



% value
                                                                       2002               2003               2004               2005               2006               2007

- Beach                                                          35.0                34.5                33.7                34.0                35.0                36.0
- Countryside                                                16.0                16.4                16.5                16.7                16.0                15.5
- Mountain                                                     16.5                16.5                16.7                16.8                17.0                16.5
- Culture                                                        30.6                30.8                31.2                30.5                30.0                31.0
- Other travel retail                                         1.9                  1.9                  1.9                  2.0                  2.0                  1.0
    destinations                                                                                                                                                                             
Travel retail                                                100.0              100.0              100.0              100.0              100.0              100.0
    destinations                                                                                                                                                                             
Source:           Euromonitor International



AED million
                                                                       2002               2003               2004               2005               2006               2007

Internet                                                          40.6                82.2              150.5              240.8              292.6              390.8
- Direct suppliers                                         33.3                67.9              123.2              198.9              248.6              343.9
- Intermediaries                                              7.3                14.3                27.2                41.9                44.0                46.9
Others                                                      9,808.9        10,536.6        11,089.9        12,018.7        13,478.1        15,219.9
Total                                                         9,849.5        10,618.7        11,240.4        12,259.5        13,770.7        15,610.7
Source:           Euromonitor International



AED million
                                                                       2002               2003               2004               2005               2006               2007

- Accommodation only                               13.4                27.7                47.8                79.5              117.7              177.5
- Flight only                                                   19.1                38.1                72.1              112.1              128.4              155.4
- Other transport only                                         -                       -                       -                       -                       -                       -
- Car rental only                                             0.3                  0.9                  2.5                  4.6                  6.8                  9.9
- Dynamic packaging                                        -                       -                  0.4                  2.7                  2.4                  3.8
- Traditional package                                    7.2                13.7                24.4                36.8                32.7                37.3
    holiday                                                                                                                                                                                      
- Other travel retail                                         0.6                  1.7                  3.3                  5.1                  4.8                  7.0
    online sales                                                                                                                                                                             
Travel retail online                                      40.6                82.2              150.5              240.8              292.6              390.8
    sales                                                                                                                                                                                         
Source:           Euromonitor International
Note:               Others includes traveller's cheques and travel insurance



% retail value rsp
Company                                                                             2003               2004               2005               2006               2007

DNATA World Travel                                                             8.6                  9.1                  8.5                  8.5                  8.2
    Services LLC                                                                                                                                                                           
Emirates Holidays LLC                                                        7.9                  8.3                  7.8                  7.6                  7.5
Arabian Adventures LLC                                                      7.1                  7.6                  7.1                  6.8                  6.2
Al-Futtaim Travel LLC                                                           6.3                  6.8                  6.4                  5.9                  5.3
Al Ansari Exchange LLC                                                      5.5                  4.5                  4.9                  5.1                  5.2
Thomas Cook Al                                                                    6.3                  6.8                  6.4                  5.8                  5.2
    Rostamani LLC                                                                                                                                                                       
Others                                                                                    58.3                56.9                59.0                60.4                62.4
Total                                                                                     100.0              100.0              100.0              100.0              100.0
Source:           Euromonitor International



                                                                                                                   Value sales                             Number of outlets
                                                                                                            (Local currency                                                             
                                                                                                                          million)                                                             

Al Ansari Exchange                                                                                          815.6                                                      50.0
Al Futtaim Travel                                                                                               822.8                                                        3.0
Arabian Adventures                                                                                          972.8                                                        3.0
DNATA                                                                                                             1,278.0                                                      52.0
Emirates Holidays                                                                                         1,175.0                                                        4.0
Thomas Cook                                                                                                    812.5                                                        5.0
Source:           Euromonitor International



outlets
                                                                       2007               2008               2009               2010               2011               2012

- Exchange services                                    136                 145                 154                 164                 175                 189
- Tour operators                                            258                 266                 276                 285                 295                 306
- Travel agents                                              422                 434                 447                 461                 476                 492
Travel retail outlets                                       816                 845                 877                 910                 946                 987
Source:           Euromonitor International
Note:               Dedicated currency exchange outlets only



AED million
                                                                       2007               2008               2009               2010               2011               2012

- Accommodation only                             865.1              935.1          1,011.8          1,095.8          1,187.8          1,288.8
- Adventure/trekking                                 455.3              503.6              557.4              617.6              685.0              760.3
    holiday                                                                                                                                                                                      
- City break                                                 871.0              987.7          1,121.1          1,273.5          1,448.0          1,647.9
- Cruise                                                       298.8              319.2              341.2              365.1              391.0              419.1
- Spa packages                                         233.7              242.8              252.5              262.9              273.9              285.7
- Flight only                                             9,416.7        11,017.5        12,901.5        15,120.5        17,736.4        20,822.5
- Other transport                                        168.0              177.6              187.9              199.0              210.9              223.8
- Fly-drive                                                    757.6              798.5              842.4              889.6              940.3              994.9
- Package holiday                                  1,374.2          1,460.8          1,554.2          1,655.3          1,764.5          1,882.7
- Travel insurance                                     437.8              482.9              533.1              589.1              651.6              721.3
- Foreign currency                                     454.5              491.3              530.6              949.8          1,023.8          1,102.7
- Traveller’s cheques                                135.9              145.6              155.8              166.5              177.8              189.8
- Other travel retail                                    142.1              152.3              163.1              174.5              186.6              199.3
    products                                                                                                                                                                                   
Travel retail products                          15,610.7        17,714.8        20,152.7        23,359.2        26,677.7        30,538.7
Source:           Euromonitor International



AED million
                                                                       2007               2008               2009               2010               2011               2012

Internet                                                        390.8              492.5              630.0              818.4          1,080.2          1,448.7
- Direct suppliers                                       343.9              443.3              578.0              763.3          1,021.3          1,385.2
- Intermediaries                                           46.9                49.2                51.9                55.1                58.9                63.4
Others                                                    15,219.9        17,222.3        19,522.7        22,540.8        25,597.5        29,090.0
Total                                                       15,610.7        17,714.8        20,152.7        23,359.2        26,677.7        30,538.7
Source:           Euromonitor International



Avon opens first LEED-certified cosmetics HQ in Manhattan

Avon opens first LEED-certified cosmetics HQ in Manhattan


The Real Deal New York

Avon opens first LEED-certified cosmetics HQ in Manhattan

Hurricane Maria: US East coast warned to monitor storm

Hurricane Maria: US East coast warned to monitor storm

by Jaleesa Baulkman @ New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

After clobbering Caribbean islands through the week, Hurricane Maria could bring “direct impacts” to the US East Coast in the coming days. “It becoming increasingly likely that some direct impacts will occur along portions of the coast next week,” the National Hurricane Center said in an advisory on Saturday. “Interests in the Bahamas and along the Carolina and Mid-Atlantic coasts should monitor the progress of Maria.” Forecasters expect “dangerous surf and rip currents” along southeastern US beaches over the next several […]

Northwood lands $150M loan to refinance FiDi office tower

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

Northwood Investors refinanced its Financial District office tower 100 Broadway with a $150 million loan from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. The new mortgage replaces a $130 million loan from Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Real Estate Weekly reported. Northwood, founded by Blackstone veteran John Kukral, bought the 380,000-square-foot, 24-story tower for $150 million in 2013 from Madison Capital and Meadow Partners. Tenants include IA Interior Architects, Tommy John and MM.LaFleur. Northwood sold the Palace […]

AVON: Makeup, Skincare, Fragrance, Fashion and much, much more!

AVON: Makeup, Skincare, Fragrance, Fashion and much, much more!


http://www.avon.ca

You'll love shopping AVON online for the latest Makeup, Skincare, Bath & Body, Fragrance, Hair, Fashion, Home, Children's and Men's products.

Nokia India Pvt Ltd - Consumer Electronics - India

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Nokia India Pvt Ltd - Consumer Electronics - India



Nokia India Pvt Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         Nokia’s success in India, one of the fastest-growing and largest mobile phone markets in the world, has given the parent company’s balance sheet a healthy look. Nokia has made the mobile phone a fast-moving consumer good in India.
·         The company is looking to grow its retail network aggressively and increase market penetration to keep up with the growth of service providers. It aims to have a presence in 5,000 Indian by the end of 2007.
·         The Korean brands LG, Samsung and Motorola are all looking to increase their market shares, and Nokia will be hard pressed to maintain its dominant position.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Nokia India Pvt Ltd
Address:
Commercial Plaza, Radisson Complex, National Highway No 8, New Delhi 110 037
Tel:
91-11-2677900
Fax:
91-11-26784100
www:
www.nokia.co.in
Activities:
Manufacture and sale of mobile phones and smartphones

Sources:         Euromonitor International from company reports, trade press



2003
2004
2005
Net sales (Rsmillion)
60,650
82,140
107,160
Number of employees
184
591
1,609

Sources:         Trade press, company research



Company Background

·         Nokia India is a wholly owned subsidiary of Nokia Group Finland, and it is present in the mobile phone sector and also in portable computers, through their smartphones.
·         During most of the review period, Nokia’s sales in India were met by imports from their other manufacturing plants, and HCL Infinet was its main distributor.


Production

·         Nokia’s manufacturing plant in India went on stream in the beginning of 2006, with trial production beginning in January. Since its official inauguration in March 2006, the plant has produced both low-end and mid-priced phones.
·         Exports to South East Asia account for about 20% of current production, according to company estimates.
·         Located in Sriperumbudur, a suburb of Chennai in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, the Indian plant is one of fifteen operated by Nokia worldwide, and reportedly the only one that makes both phones and network equipment.


Competitive Positioning

·         Nokia India is by far the leader in the mobile phones sector. Industry estimates indicate that in GSM phones, Nokia had an overwhelming 79% of retail volumes, in 2005, but in CDMA, its share is a little below 18%. In the b2b networks business in India, it is also one of the leading companies – along with Ericsson.
·         Nokia sells a wide range of phones in India, catering to all price segments. While it uses its high-end phones to create aspirations and develop an image of technology leadership, its highest-selling models are the basic ones. In August 2004, a study by ORG-Gfk found that the top-selling models in India were Nokia’s 1100, 3315 and 2300.
·         With an overall share of 56% in mobile phones, Nokia is by far the leading NBO. Even within portable computers, its smartphones have taken market share from other producers’ palmtops and laptops to make it the leading brand.
·         The Nokia’s brand’s share has grown by leaps and bounds between 2002 and 2005 and Indian consumers have warmed to the brand as its reliability has been proven, and it is now seen as offering good value for money. The Nokia 1100 was advertised as “Made for India”, which increased its acceptance among consumers.
·         Nokia has promoted itself in the GSM sector, rather than the sector within India. This has paid off, as CDMA has struggled to gain acceptance in India after 2003, which has affected the competing brand LG.

Subsector
Share (%)
Rank
Mobile phones
56
1
Mobile computers
59
1

Sources:         Trade press, company research, trade interviews, Euromonitor International estimates


Consumer Electronics Market in the Netherlands

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

 Consumer Electronics Market in the Netherlands-Dissertation Writing Help



Executive Summary


Navigation Systems Tip the Scale in Favour of 2007


When comparing overall sales levels for consumer electronics to those of the previous year, the numbers are virtually the same, with the exception of in-car consumer electronics. The sales of navigation systems continued to show growth in 2007, and this is why the value sales for the sector as a whole increased. Sales of in-home and portable consumer electronics also remained stable at a high level, although these overall figures hide some major shifts within these sectors.

Good Year for Television, But Not As Good As the Previous World Cup Year


After exceptional sales in 2006, volume sales of televisions declined, which was not surprising since the World Cup was a major influence on television sales and there was no comparable major sporting event in 2007. This does not mean that 2007 was a bad year, however, and the shift from analogue to digital televisions continued so that overall value sales again showed growth. Although the unit prices of flat-screen televisions are coming under pressure, they are still far more expensive than analogue models. Televisions have remained a major driver of growth in value sales of consumer electronics in the Netherlands.

Cameras Decline, But Maintain A Reasonable Level of Sales


After massive growth during the review period, sales of cameras in the Netherlands stabilised in 2007, and there were small declines in terms of both value and volume. Although it is disappointing that this market is showing a decline, it is in some ways remarkable that the camera sector continues to show such high sales levels. Digital cameras continued to do well, as technological advances were the main driver of sales in 2007. Many Dutch consumers are now upgrading their old cameras to more sophisticated models, while cameras are also becoming more attractive in terms of design. Compact cameras are becoming smaller, while screens are getting larger. Dutch consumers appreciate these improved designs and for many this is a reason to buy a new camera.

Car Navigation Saves the Day for In-car Consumer Electronics


The total in-car consumer electronics sector in the Netherlands continued to show impressive growth rates in 2007, but that is only part of the story, since all the growth is attributable to navigation systems while sales of other in-car consumer electronics products have remained under severe pressure. The Dutch have embraced navigation systems, and more of them were converted to the use of these devices in 2007. In-car audio, speakers and other in-car electronics suffered further decline, as new cars have more electronics built in, which is leading to a natural decline in the after-market for in-car electronics products.

Television A Major Driver Behind Forecast Growth


The forecast for consumer electronics over the period 2007–2012 is very positive. Sales of televisions are one of the major drivers of growth. Digital televisions not only contribute greatly to the overall growth of the sector but also lead to growth in other sectors, since the purchase of a digital television often leads to purchases of many other digital products for use together with the new set. Growth in in-home consumer electronics will be a major determinant of the overall growth of the consumer electronics market.


Key Trends and Developments


Improved Economic Conditions Have A Positive Effect on Consumer Confidence


Although the downturn of 2003 was not particularly dramatic in terms of the economic indicators, it was a pretty significant event to the average Dutch consumer. In 2007, the Dutch economy continued the recovery that began in the previous year, so that the Dutch economy has recovered over the past two years. In 2003, real GDP declined by 1%, while inflation was disturbingly high in the range of 4–5%, but the economy then slowly got back on its feet. Unemployment remains a cause for concern, however, as the unemployment rate has increased year on year since 2001.

Current impact


These adverse economic conditions had a deep impact on the consumer electronics sector as a whole, since they provided the conditions for the price war, in which Dutch consumers became more price conscious and retailers more competitive. Following the economic recovery in 2007, price became less of a concern to Dutch consumers and they were once again willing to invest in quality and design. The popularity of digital television sets for instance was boosted by the improvement in economic conditions.

Outlook


After a low point in 2003 with negative real GDP growth, the Dutch economy seems to have turned the corner and most economic indicators are pointing in the right direction. Average annual real GDP growth is expected to exceed 2% over the forecast period, while inflation should also be curbed and is expected to remain below 2%. High unemployment will remain the major problem facing the Dutch economy, and unemployment is expected to rise further to reach 8% in 2010. High unemployment of course will mean that those affected will have limited spending power.

Impact


The economic recovery will have a positive impact on spending on consumer electronics over the next forecast period. Consumers will be less price sensitive, which will bring relief from the ongoing price war in the Dutch retail sector. This increased consumer confidence will boost sales of larger electronics products such as flat-screen televisions and laptops, as some consumer groups are now beginning to replace their existing models, having postponed such purchases during a period of economic uncertainty.

Increased consumer confidence and the resulting greater willingness to invest in quality and design should help to offset the effects of a number of negative factors, such as increasing competition and the changing retail environment. For manufacturers and retailers alike, this will create more room for added value products.

Demographic Developments Change the Consumer Landscape


The Dutch population has been going through two major demographic changes over the past few decades. First, as in most West European countries, the Dutch population is ageing and the birth rate is in decline; almost 30% of the Dutch population, or about 5 million people, are currently over the age of 50. Second, there have been increases in the proportions of small and one-person households. This is related to the ageing trend, as many older people are living alone, but younger people are also living in small households or remaining single for longer. These two major trends have changed Dutch society and therefore consumer habits over recent decades.

Current impact


Generally speaking, consumers' buying behaviour concerning consumer electronics tends to differ depending on their age. Tastes and preferences change as people grow older, and the lifestyles and preferences of older people change. Older consumers tend to have higher incomes and also pay more attention to specific details such as design.

The increase in the number of one-person households has also had a considerable impact, affecting for instance the number and type of products that are sold. If households are smaller, there will also be more of them, and every household will have at least a minimum number of consumer electronics products. This demographic change has therefore had a positive effect on volume sales.

Outlook


It is unlikely that there will be any major change in direction over the forecast period concerning these two demographic trends. Birth rates will remain stagnant, and little growth is expected during the next two decades. The Dutch population will continue to age, with the proportion of those aged 50 or over expected to reach 37% in the year 2015, demonstrating a clear greying of the population. As a result, the observed major shifts will continue and the role of older consumer groups in Dutch grocery retail will become increasingly important.

Future impact


The changing demographics will certainly influence the development of the sector over the forecast period. Older consumers and those living in smaller households will be more interested in a more personal approach to consumer electronics. Instead of enjoying the benefits of consumer electronics products in company with other people, these consumers will choose portable devices which they can use to indulge their personal tastes and preferences. Sectors such as portable consumer electronics and laptops will therefore grow further, since these are the technologies that enable consumers to get what they want, when they want it.

Rapid Development of the Internet Impacts on Consumer Electronics Sector


Dutch ownership of computers increased rapidly over the review period, and the Netherlands is one of the top three countries in Europe in terms of access to Broadband, to which more than 70% of households now have connections. The Internet is therefore now a central technology in Dutch households, so that many consumers now also use it as a source of entertainment. The Internet was initially used mostly for sending and receiving emails and looking up practical information. Now, however, with wireless Broadband connections, this technology is also used to listen to music, watch movies and television series, and exchange photos and home movies. This trend has also had an impact on most subsectors in consumer electronics.

Current impact


In television, for instance, this means that analogue models are now less popular because they are less compatible with movies that can be downloaded in digital form. The Internet has also increased the popularity of portable media players, which has had an impact on audio players as many consumers choose to buy a high-end portable player rather than a more static audio set. In computers, the impact is obvious: today's consumer prefers the more flexible laptop as wireless Broadband and the availability of wi-fi connections in public spaces enable it to be used more easily to access the Internet.

Outlook


Although the development of the Internet has been incredibly rapid over the review period, it is unlikely to have reached its full potential. Over the forecast period, wireless and rapid Internet connections will accelerate even more and will lead to dramatic changes in the consumer electronics sector in the Netherlands. It is also likely that the Netherlands will remain a relative front runner in Europe, as the Dutch are very willing to embrace the Internet and mobile technology.

It is of course unlikely that the penetration of Broadband connections will increase much further as it is already over 70%, but the speed of these connections will certainly continue to increase, and the possibilities offered by Internet-based technologies will therefore also expand further. Dutch consumers will also come to expect that all consumer electronics products will be compatible with, and able to interact with, the Internet.

Future impact


Most analogue technologies will either disappear or become niche markets for enthusiasts. The digital technologies are already mainstream in the Netherlands and this trend will only accelerate over the forecast period. There will be a further shift from static to portable, wireless digital consumer electronics products. Dutch consumers are very interested in technology of this type as long as it is practical and affordable. For instance, it is already possible to access the Internet using a mobile phone, but this technology is still in the early stages of development in the Netherlands. Rates for this service are dropping, however, and most new mobile phones purchased over the next 2–3 years will offer this facility.

There are many other examples. The Internet will have a major impact, for instance, in the DVD players and VCRs sector. It is likely that televisions will be connected directly to the Internet, which will eliminate the need for a separate DVD player or even a hard disk recorder. The Internet will also impact on the development of portable products, as multimedia players will become even more attractive. The increase in these players' memory capacity and the ease with which various media may be downloaded from the Internet will increase their popularity relative to analogue models and mp3 players.

Non-traditional Retail Channels Becoming More Important


The emergence of retailers outside the traditional retail channels, in particular in small electrical appliances, remains an important issue. The arrival of German retail giant Media Markt has made Dutch consumers highly sensitive to price. The increased importance of retailers from outside the traditional retail channels has had also a major influence on market conditions.

Current impact


Non-traditional channels such as discount drugstores and DIY stores are heavily promoting domestic electrical appliances. The Internet is playing an increasingly important role. The world-wide web is now used not only to compare products and prices, but also increasingly to make purchases directly on line. These new developments have had an immediate impact on the Dutch consumer electronics sector, in particular through their negative effect on average prices. Although the Dutch have been more inclined to increase their spending after the recovery of the Dutch economy, this increased competition between the various channels has not helped to add value to the sector.

Outlook


The shake-out among Dutch durable goods retailers has weeded out the weaker players such as smaller chains and small independent retailers, but the shift from traditional retailers to new players and alternative channels probably still has some way to go. Alternative channels such as DIY retailers, food discounters and drugstores have found that offering extreme deals on specially selected domestic appliances can bring a lot of traffic into their stores. This therefore remains an important weapon for these retailers.

The Internet has not reached its full potential, and a lot is to be expected from this new channel. Dutch consumers are rapidly increasing their online spending and the increased professionalism of online retailers has increased consumer confidence. The number of units sold on line will therefore continue to increase, and competition amongst various types of retailers will remain fierce.

Future impact


Together with the arrival of new players such as Media Markt and BCC, and increasing sales through alternative channels such as DIY retailers, food discounters and drugstores, the Internet is a major factor that has affected every part of the market. Many consumers now use product comparison sites to compare prices on line, and the resulting increase in transparency of prices has increased pressure on retailers to offer the lowest prices. Moreover, consumers are now better informed before they step into the store, and they are prepared to negotiate and insist on a discount.

All these new developments have had a major influence on the Dutch retail sector and many traditional retail chains have found it hard to compete. As a result, the retail sector has experienced a shake-out, and some chains have had to close a number of outlets or have gone out of business altogether. Manufacturers of consumer appliances will therefore have to negotiate with traditional retailers that enjoy greater buying power as the smaller players are pushed out of the market. For online retailers, price will be the most important issue because of the transparency of the market, so manufacturers will also have to be creative in dealing with these new players.

Blurring of Sectors in Consumer Electronics


It is increasingly difficult to distinguish clearly between the different consumer electronics sectors as many products now incorporate functionalities from other sectors. Mobile phones incorporate mp3 players and digital cameras; PDAs are starting to resemble small laptops and some are even equipped with navigational software; digital cameras now have many features of camcorders; and multimedia players now offer video, which has an effect on the development of in-home entertainment products. The dividing lines between all sectors are now becoming increasingly blurred and it is difficult to tell where one sector ends and another begins.

Current impact


There are many examples of how the various sectors are struggling to cope with new technological developments in other sectors. In most cases the more "static" technologies are losing out to more mobile or portable technologies. For instance, VCRs and DVD players are losing volume and value sales, while portable DVD and multimedia players are showing some of the highest growth rates. The same is true for camcorders, whose sales have come under pressure from the competition from mobile phones and digital cameras despite increased interest in small videos and clips.

Outlook


This blurring of the sectors is likely to continue, as manufacturers of portable consumer electronics in particular will seek to integrate as many functions as they possibly can. This is particularly relevant to sectors such as digital cameras, portable multimedia players and mobile phones. These sectors have already achieved most of their potential for volume growth, and manufacturers will now try to convince their current customers to increase their replacement frequency. This is best achieved by seducing them with cool new features, which are an important tool for persuading consumers to replace their old consumer electronic devices with new ones.

Future impact


These ongoing trends are forcing manufacturers to be proactive and change their strategy in order to deal with competition from all sectors. For instance, TomTom, the major player in Dutch navigation systems, is currently putting a lot of energy into the development of its navigational software. TomTom recognises that its popular systems may soon face competition from other types of product, such as mobile phones and PDAs. By becoming a major player in both systems and software, however, it can partner with manufacturers from other sectors to improve its position. This shows that it is possible for a manufacturer to anticipate the competition from other sectors and manoeuvre into a position from which it can benefit from the blurring of sectors rather than becoming a victim of new market circumstances.

Lenovo (China) Ltd - Consumer Electronics - China

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help



Lenovo (China) Ltd - Consumer Electronics - China

Lenovo (china) Ltd



Strategic Direction

·         The company will keep its position as the leader in PCs within China, and its global presence will also continue to maintain strong growth. Its step-by-step strategy will focus on expanding its outlets and networks across China during the forecast period. Lenovo will continue to increase the number and size of its solution centres in mainland China, which concentrate mainly on technical support and consultancy services.
·         With global retail distribution channels, the company aims to become a leader in the IT industry. With R&D facilities at Yamato, Japan, manufacturing plant at Raleigh, North Carolina, and sales headquarters throughout the world, Lenovo is poised to make a grand entrance onto the world stage. Meanwhile the company will continue to launch low-cost laptops to compete with domestic brands within China and gain more market share in the low-end segment.
·         As the current economic challenges affect the customers and suppliers of the entire industry, the company is trying to move quickly and decisively to manage its business during this difficult period. The company will reduce its management costs and may reduce its staff in the future.


Key Facts


Full name of company:
Lenovo (China) Ltd
Address:
6 Chuangye Road, Shangdi, Haidian District, Beijing
Tel:
+86 10 5886 8888
Fax:
+86 10 5886 8876
www:
http://www.lenovo.com.cn
Activities:
Computers, portable computers, mobile phones, storage drives, IT services, etc.
Source:           Euromonitor International from company reports, trade press



2005
2006
2007
Net sales (RMB billion)
69.3
74.1
112.7
Net profit (RMB billion)
6.8
7.2
10.3
Number of employees
n/a
23,200
25,120
Source:           Trade press, company research



Company Background

·         35.2% of Lenovo was owned by public shareholders, 46.9% by Legend Holdings Limited, and 19.9% by IBM. The Chinese Academy of Sciences, a government agency, owns 65% of Legend Holdings in turn, so in effect the Chinese government owns about 30.5% of Lenovo and is the largest shareholder in the company.
·         Lenovo is also China’s top PC manufacturer, which makes it an obvious choice to represent China as an Olympic sponsor. It has been China’s delegate for the 2006 Winter Games in Turin as well as for the Beijing Games in summer 2008. Boasting a client list that includes Chinese government offices, top Chinese companies, and the US organisations NBC and NFL, among others, Lenovo seems intent on maintaining and building its business through an ability to supply high-quality customised products for the mass market with a relatively short turnround time.
·         Lenovo has located its management headquarters in the US and its global marketing centre in India, although its manufacturing base remains in China. Lenovo operates from facilities in Beijing, Raleigh (North Carolina), Singapore and Paris, and it has research centres in Japan, China, and the US. Through Legend Holdings, it has a good process and business methods after allocating these resources. As well as technological innovation, the competitiveness of a global company relies to a large extent on innovative business methods.
·         Lenovo is present in the IT industry, where its products include desktop and notebook PCs, workstations, servers, storage drives and IT services. It also offers IT management software under the ThinkVantage name. Lenovo produces desktops, laptops, servers, hand-held computers, imaging equipment and mobile phone handsets. Lenovo also provides information technology integration and support services, and its QDI unit offers contract manufacturing. Lenovo also offers Internet access.
·         In order to maintain its profile among small and medium-sized enterprises and individual consumers, the development of its brand is especially important to Lenovo. It should promote the brand by using innovative and high-quality products, and it should also put a great deal of money into brand publicity.
·         Lenovo has both national and regional distribution networks, and it has made efforts to expand into the small and medium-sized enterprise markets, and to develop the overseas small enterprise market by leveraging on double business mode. As an international enterprise Lenovo had its global marketing centre in India.
·         Lenovo has been actively sponsoring world sporting events in recent years. In 2004, Lenovo sponsored the Williams F1 Formula One team and in 2007 it sponsored the National Basketball Association (NBA). In 2006 Lenovo used the Brazilian soccer star Ronaldinho Pummy to promote its new products. The company was also chosen to design the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The curly design on the torch is based on a traditional Chinese representation of clouds. It is clearly based on symbolism and also appears to have been inspired by the shape of a traditional Chinese scroll.


Production

·         Most Lenovo products are made within China, and the company does not sell imported products. Based in the Chinese domestic market, Lenovo won its initial success by competing with the established foreign players and promoting the development of a national IT industry. It has introduced the ThinkPad R61 and T61 notebook PCs, which are the first notebooks to use the new Santa Rosa platform from Intel. Lenovo has successfully completed a reform of its corporate ownership by transforming itself from a state-owned enterprise into a corporation with a modern corporate governance structure.
·         Lenovo also has manufacturing facilities in Beijing, Huiyang, Shanghai and Shenzhen (all in China) and Pondicherry (in India). Lenovo exports its products world-wide. Lenovo has previously sold servers in China under the SureServer brand, but it is now breaking out of its home market for the first time.
·         The company has become the biggest domestic manufacturer of PCs and distributor of third-party products through its wholesale business. It does not produce stock for other manufacturers. Lenovo expects that its laptop sales, excluding those of Thinkpad, will grow by 60% as young students choose their models. Lenovo’s laptops will be welcomed by the market with functions including a high-definition video player, a large hard disk (250 GB) and facial recognition.
·         Lenovo Group Ltd will launch its first ultra-mobile personal computer (UMPC) in August 2009 to compete with Asus and Hewlett-Packard in the small PC market. Lenovo’s new UMPC models, called S9 and S10 (with 9- and 10-inch screens), are expected to sell at prices in the rage of RMB 2,999–3,999. Unlike Asus’s first-generation EeePC, which features small-capacity solid-state hard disks, Lenovo’s UMPCs feature a hard disk with a 120 gigabyte capacity and a Windows XP operating system.
·         Among the new technologies utilised by the IdeaCentre K210 is the VeriFace TM3 facial recognition technology that allows the user to log in by having the camera recognise his/her facial image. The K210 is the only desktop PC that offers this distinctive feature, and it also features an anti-microbial keyboard that uses special material to inhibit bacterial growth. This is especially helpful for families in which many people use the same keyboard and are concerned with “keyboard germs”.
·         Lenovo is introducing the ThinkPad R61 and T61 notebook PCs. Lenovo has announced that it will begin selling laptops to business and private customers with preinstalled Linux.

Location
Brand
Annual production
Beijing
Lenovo
> 29.7 million units
Beijing
IBM
> 10.3 million units

Sources:         Trade press, company research, trade interviews



Competitive Positioning

·         The company’s core business ranges from computers to IT services, it leads the market in laptops and desktops, and it markets a narrow product portfolio. Lenovo retreated from the digital cameras sector, since it found it hard to compete with Japanese brands even in the domestic market.
·         Lenovo’s products have focused on both the middle market and the high end. Lenovo prodicts are targeted on the mid-range market while laptops made under the IBM brand are premium productss. In other markets for consumer electronics products, such as mobile phones, the company has focused more on the low end.
·         The company is leading the market in both laptops and desktops, with respective shares of 35.3% and 27.2% in 2007, which is all the more remarkable since the competition in China is relatively fierce. The company’s market share in laptops increased since its prices are very competitive and the design of Lenovo branded laptops is similar to that of laptops produced under the IBM brand. Its market share in desktops is declining, however, since consumers have many options when buying desktops while Lenovo cannot offer any overwhelming advantages in this sector.
·         The company is typically a leader in innovation in the laptops market, and it has very strong R&D teams both in China and overseas. The group has research centres in Yamato (in Japan), in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen (in China), and in Raleigh, North Carolina. The company has spent a lot money on new product development, and many other players are following Lenovo’s lead.
·         The company is interested in leading the market in computers, and it is making efforts to enlarge its distribution network and presence within China through cooperation with a range of local dealers that it formerly regarded as its profit eaters.
·         The group’s performance was driven by strong growth in sales of notebook computers to both consumer and small enterprise segments. As the disposable incomes of domestic consumers have increased, the company has positioned itself in the fastest-growth and more mature market segments.

Product type
Volume share (%)
Rank
Desktops
27.2
1
Digital cameras
3.2
9
Mobile phones
1.9
7
Laptops
35.3
1
Source:           Euromonitor International


Avon distribution restructuring leads to closures

Avon distribution restructuring leads to closures


CosmeticsDesign.com USA

Avon Products says that as parts of major global restructuring plans it is to build a state-of-the-art distribution facility in the Midwest, leading to the consolidation and closure of two distribution centres in Delaware and Illinois.

Spruce Capital accused in suit of selling $21M mansion’s buyer a “death trap”

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

The buyer of a $20.7 million Greenwich Village mansion accused Spruce Capital Partners of selling a “death trap.” The developers had redeveloped the six-story building at 116 Waverly Place into a mansion and sold it in August 2016. But in a lawsuit filed Wednesday, the unidentified buyer claims that he or she “discovered numerous and significant defects and deficiencies including, but not limited to, life threatening issues which required substantial and costly emergency repairs,” including […]

A new tenant harassment law could incite sham complaints

by Lexi @ The Real Deal New York

From the September issue: There’s no shortage of bad actor landlord horror stories in New York City, from property owners busting down doors to sending in attack dogs. Last month, the City Council passed a slew of tenant-harassment protection bills, one of which puts the onus on landlords to prove any alleged actions — from shutting off utilities to calling a tenant late at the night — were not intended to harass and displace a tenant. […]

Car Market - Into and Out of Recession - UK

by noreply@blogger.com (MahaSagar Publications) @ Dissertation Help

Car Market - Into and Out of Recession - UK  

The Car Buyer – New or Second-hand?


Key points
              Potential demand for second-hand cars far outweighs potential demand for new cars and demand for used is still skewed to 15-34 C1C2DEs while demand for new is still skewed towards over-45 ABs.
              Although the use of a mortgage specifically for the purpose of buying a car is rarely admitted by consumers, the availability of surplus funds following the remortgaging of a property appears to be a major determinant influencing new car purchases.
              Potential used car buyers are more likely to be renting property or living at home with parents and so the decline in the UK housing market in terms of property values and housing transactions is less likely to be an influence on demand for used cars than new.
              Owning property outright, as a high proportion of potential new car buyers tend to do, means that new car buyers with homes paid for are unconstrained by mortgages from buying a new car and are ideal prospects for point-of-sale motor finance.
              The majority of intended car purchases are for a replacement vehicle, particularly among older and more affluent groups, which implies the purchase of a new rather than second-hand car.
              Purchasers of a first car are the youngest and least affluent, indicating that the bulk of these will be purchases of second-hand cars.

Property ownership – a major influence on new car demand
              Used car buyers form the largest proportion of those intending to buy a car and used car buyers are more likely to be the younger and less affluent groups aged 15-34 and in C1C2DE groups with incomes under £29,999.
              While some used car buyers might be buying their own home, they are more likely to rent property or are still living at home and still single.
              New car buyers, by comparison, are more likely to be older, affluent, over-45s and in the AB socio-economic group. They are also more likely to be separated, divorced or widowed without any children living at home and have an income of above £30,000.
              New car buyers are more likely to either own their home outright or be in the process of buying their own home. Property status and the absence of a mortgage or only a relatively small one are therefore likely to be a significant factor influencing the decision as to whether or not to buy a new car.

FIGURE 21: Type of car intend to buy, by demographic sub-group, 2008

Base: adults aged 17+ who intend to buy a car in the next 12 months

New
Second-hand
Don't know yet

%
%
%




All
20.2
56.2
19.2




Gender:



Male
20.5
56.7
18.5
Female
19.8
55.7
20.1




Age group:



17-24
8.2
61.2
28.6
25-34
8.9
62.9
22.5
35-44
21.5
57.9
17.4
45-54
24.6
57.2
14.2
55-64
33.1
48.4
13.7
65+
39.4
37.3
13.8




Socio-economic group:



AB
28.0
51.8
17.5
C1
18.4
58.2
19.2
C2
14.1
58.4
21.2
D
13.2
58.3
23.4
E
22.0
59.4
11.0




Marital status:



Single
10.3
62.3
23.4
Married/civil partnership/living as a couple
22.9
54.9
18.1
Separated/divorced/widowed
27.0
49.8
15.7




Children in household:



Yes
17.5
58.3
20.1
No
21.9
55.0
18.6
Child(ren) under 1 year
10.5
73.2
15.9
1-4 years
17.7
55.4
25.4
5-9 years
23.1
53.2
17.6
10-15 years
18.1
59.3
16.2




Family income before tax:



Up to £9,999
12.9
61.4
21.2
£10,000-19,999
17.2
58.1
18.8
£20,000-29,999
15.9
63.5
18.0
£30,000-39,999
21.2
55.5
17.6
£40,000-49,999
27.3
57.4
10.8
£50,000 or over
25.8
49.3
23.1




Accommodation status:



Own home outright
30.4
46.4
17.8
Buying home
19.5
59.6
18.0
Rent from council
14.1
53.6
25.9
Rent from someone else
9.5
64.6
21.5
Occupy rent-free
6.8
64.9
7.2
Rent-free – council
0.0
35.8
12.4
Rent-free – someone else
10.5
80.4
4.5
Own/buying home
23.4
54.8
18.0
Rent home
11.5
59.9
23.4




Region:



Scotland
26.4
50.3
17.5
North West
20.0
44.6
27.0
North
21.9
52.8
22.0
Yorkshire & Humberside
26.1
53.0
18.9
East Midlands
15.8
66.9
12.6
East Anglia
23.3
65.4
10.4
South East
21.5
58.5
16.5
Greater London
17.2
53.8
23.9
South West
17.2
65.6
12.3
Wales
18.9
57.2
20.9
West Midlands
15.3
56.7
24.0


Taken from the TGI survey of around 25,000 adults
SOURCE: GB TGI, BMRB 1998 & Q3 2008/Mintel

New or second-hand? – influenced by lifestage and life event
              The young age profile of those intending to buy a second-hand car means that by lifestage buyers are more likely to be Fledglings, those that have Flown the Nest and ABC1 Nest Builders. Less affluent parents of school age children plus C2DE Mid-life Independents and Unconstrained Couples are more likely to be buyers of second-hand cars.
              Potential new car buyers are, by comparison, more likely to be the affluent equivalent of used car buyers, namely ABC1 parents of school age children; whereas used car buyers comprised the younger end of the lifestage spectrum, new car buyers predominated the older end of the spectrum.
              Where the young end of the spectrum for used car buyers comprised both ABC1 and C2DE groups, the older end spectrum for new car buyers also comprised both ABC1 and C2DE groups for both Senior Sole Decision Makers and Empty Nesters – the primary groups for new cars.
              In terms of life events, new car and second-hand car prospects occupy opposite ends. For younger second-hand car buyers it is starting or changing a job, moving out of home or in with a partner and getting engaged that are the life events that can trigger the desire or need to buy a second-hand car.
              For new car prospects, making major home improvements, the marriage of an older child, the birth of grandchildren and entering into retirement are the life events that can trigger the desire or need for a new car.
              Clearly, life events can be a key determinant in influencing the need or desire to buy a car, whether a first car, second car or replacement. Whether it is to be new or second-hand is more likely to be influenced by lifestage, which in turn is related to affluence in later life after children leave home and become independent and as financial commitments such as mortgages diminish.
              The opposite of course is true for second-hand car buyers where embarking in life in marriage, raising children and mortgage commitments result in scarce financial resources making ownership of a second-hand car a more practical choice.

FIGURE 22: Type of car intend to buy, by lifestage and life event, 2008

Base: adults aged 17+ who intend to buy a car in the next 12 months

New
Second-hand
Don't know yet

%
%
%




All
20.2
56.2
19.2




Lifestage:



Fledglings – ABC1
10.8
63.8
22.0
Fledglings – C2DE
8.9
62.5
24.4
Flown the Nest – ABC1
6.9
62.0
27.8
Flown the Nest – C2DE
17.1
66.5
16.3
Nest Builders – ABC1
10.8
62.0
23.1
Nest Builders – C2DE
3.7
51.5
40.6
Playschool Parents – ABC1
24.2
58.9
15.9
Playschool Parents – C2DE
6.8
62.4
28.8
Primary School Parents – ABC1
24.0
50.1
22.9
Primary School Parents – C2DE
13.5
59.0
13.3
Secondary School Parents – ABC1
24.0
56.5
14.8
Secondary School Parents – C2DE
14.2
59.3
18.8
Mid-life Independents – ABC1
18.8
65.7
12.2
Mid-life Independents – C2DE
14.5
72.6
8.5
Unconstrained Couples – ABC1
25.5
53.9
18.1
Unconstrained Couples – C2DE
18.2
71.3
7.7
Hotel Parents – ABC1
19.6
59.3
15.8
Hotel Parents – C2DE
23.5
52.3
19.2
Senior Sole Decision Makers – ABC1
41.4
38.2
15.0
Senior Sole Decision Makers – C2DE
25.3
42.5
16.2
Empty Nesters – ABC1
43.5
40.8
11.6
Empty Nesters – C2DE
31.4
49.5
12.8
Non-standard Families
13.7
46.8
34.2
Unclassified
3.6
89.0
2.2




Life events experienced in the last 12 months:



Finish school
11.0
52.1
32.6
Start university
10.0
55.7
19.1
Start first job
2.4
61.4
29.7
Change job
9.5
56.5
32.7
Move out of parental home
2.9
62.6
34.0
Move in with partner
4.4
60.0
34.8
Get engaged
7.5
62.5
29.5
Get married
6.3
50.6
42.4
Purchase/sell a house/flat
16.2
53.0
25.6
Make major home improvements
21.4
54.9
20.9
Birth of your first child
13.2
50.8
31.2
Birth of your second or subsequent child
1.4
59.8
30.5
Child goes to university
20.8
65.9
12.5
Child gets married
44.4
41.1
12.1
Birth of grandchild
26.1
57.7
10.1
Divorce/separate from long-term partner
12.0
67.4
16.2
Enter retirement
25.1
51.6
17.9


Taken from the TGI survey of around 25,000 adults
SOURCE: GB TGI, BMRB 1998 & Q3 2008/Mintel

Replacement or new demand?
              For the majority of those intending to buy a car, the car to be purchased is a replacement for an existing car while for approximately a third of respondents it is a first car with just 10% intending to buy an additional car.
              The demographics of those intending to buy a replacement car correspond with those of new car buyers, with those more likely to buy a replacement car being over-35s in the affluent AB group. High replacement demand among the C2 group implies either potential new car buyers or purchasing of used or nearly new cars.
              Those intending to buy a car as a first car are more likely to be women than men, aged 15-34 in the DE socio-economic group, which corresponds to the ownership demographics of used car buyers.
              The intended purchasing of an additional car is skewed towards the young and the middle-aged, affluent ABs and less affluent Ds. This is likely to reflect different demand characteristics at different lifestages and as different life events occur.
              The regions that will potentially benefit from higher replacement demand will be the North, Yorkshire and Humberside, East Midlands and the South West. Additional demand for cars is more likely to occur in Scotland, East Anglia, the South East and Wales. New demand is most likely to occur in Greater London and the West Midlands, indicating an increase in demand for cars in areas of high population densities.

FIGURE 23: Type of car intend to buy, by demographic sub-group, 2008

Base: adults aged 17+ who intend to buy a car in the next 12 months

A first car
An additional car
A replacement car

%
%
%




All
30.7
9.6
54.2




Gender:



Male
28.7
9.9
56.0
Female
33.1
9.4
51.9




Age group:



17-24
53.8
11.4
32.4
25-34
39.0
8.8
46.5
35-44
21.1
14.0
61.1
45-54
22.5
10.7
60.7
55-64
19.4
5.1
69.1
65+
18.2
1.8
67.1




Socio-economic group:



AB
20.4
11.2
64.4
C1
32.5
8.1
52.5
C2
29.6
9.1
55.7
D
41.2
12.9
40.2
E
62.9
3.3
27.6